Saturday, March 10, 2018

Lake Worth District 1 Commissioner Scott Maxwell receives Palm Beach-Treasure Coast AFL-CIO endorsement.

And so did Lake Worth
Mayor Pam Triolo.


“Representing: Palm Beach  •  Martin  •  St. Lucie  •  Indian River  •  Okeechobee Counties”

Click on image to enlarge:
To find out more about Lake Worth Commissioner Scott Maxwell click on this link for his website,
or if you prefer, for Maxwell’s Facebook page
use this link.

Paid By Scott Maxwell for Lake Worth Commission, District 1


Click on image to enlarge:
From the Re-Elect Mayor Pam Triolo website: “Mayor Triolo is committed to sustainability, both financial and environmental. She has taken a city on the brink of bankruptcy and turned it around.”

Political advertisement paid for and approved by Pam Triolo for Mayor.

The Coastal/Greenacres Observer and
The Palm Beach Post both endorsed Judith “Judy” Dugo, the incumbent, in Greenacres’ Council District 3 race.


The race for Council District 4 in Greenacres, one could say, is an entirely different story.


Please continue reading to find out why one editor wrote some very harsh words about a candidate in the Greenacres District 4 race, a former elected official who should “never be considered for a position in the public trust.” Wow.

Before we get to that, learn more about Councilwoman Judith Dugo, who was endorsed by both the Observer and the Post, by clicking on this link. She is one of the four candidates on the ballot for two Council seats next Tuesday, March 13th. From the Greenacres’ municipal website:

Councilwoman Judith Dugo was elected into office in March 2014, and has been re-elected into office most recently in March 2016.
     Judith has been a Greenacres resident for 19 years.

If you’re holding a cup of coffee and/or eating something right now, you may want to put the cup down and not take another bite.

Because now it gets very, very interesting. In the Greenacres District 4 race, the editor at the Greenacres Observer wrote this about one of the candidates in the District 4 race:

He “[S]quandered tax dollars, depleted reserves, was untruthful from the dais and the list of ill deeds goes on. . . .”, and he “displayed enough dishonesty to never be considered for a position in the public trust.”

Pretty harsh words, huh?

Now let’s take a brief stroll back to 2016–2017, back in the day when the Post used to cover what was going on in Greenacres. By the way, The Coastal/Greenacres Observer (which is published by the same editor who publishes The Lake Worth Herald) has been covering the news from Greenacres quite extensively and thoroughly for many years now in both newspapers.

However, the same can’t be said for The Palm Beach Post. The Post got kicked out of Greenacres for good in March 2016 when they published this silly nonsense ‘ranking’ all the cities, towns, and villages in Palm Beach County.


Greenacres is ‘[A] lot of nothing’?
A ‘gumbo’ with an “[E]xtra dollop of Hispanic? One could say this attempt at satire’ fell flat in Greenacres. Why? Because in March 2017. . .

Mr. Joel Flores who was raised “by a single hard-working mother who is a teacher” and and is a “decorated 13 year Army veteran” became Mayor Joel Flores in the City of Greenacres.

Flores beat out Jonathan G. Pearce in March 2017 by a wide margin, 55% to 45%. The Post endorsed Pearce in that election race. Pearce, remember, was the former councilman in Greenacres who resigned his seat to run against Flores.

Before we proceed, take a moment to learn a little bit more about Mayor Flores.

Mayor Joel Flores was elected Mayor of Greenacres in March 2017. . . . [A] 13 year decorated Army Veteran, earned the Army Commendation Medal and Army Accomplishment Medal for his distinguished duty and service in Operation Enduring Freedom, Afghanistan.


In the other March 2017 election race in Greenacres the Post endorsed Michael Albert. The Post got that one wrong too. Paula Bousquet, now Deputy Mayor Paula Bousquet, won that race by 53% to Albert’s 47%. That’s right, the editor at the Post was 0 for 2 in Greenacres.

A little information about the incumbent next Tuesday in the other race being held in Greenacres, District 4 Councilman Anderson Thelusme. From the city website:

On Monday April 17, 2017, at their regular City Council meeting, the City Council unanimously appointed Mr. Anderson Thelusme to the vacant District IV Council Seat. Councilman. Thelusme relocated to the City of Greenacres in 2009 following a visit to see a friend where he became fond of the City's charm and potential for growth and opportunity. . . . He also is an advocate for strong mentorship programs for our children and feels that civic engagement will ensure transparency in local government.


Now, without further ado. Let’s get back to the elections next Tuesday and the recent endorsements.

Please take note: The Greenacres Observer endorsed Councilman Anderson Thelusme in the elections next Tuesday and the Post endorsed the challenger, Jonathan Pearce.

See excerpts from the Greenacres Observer endorsements below. First, from the editor at the Post, their second attempt to get Pearce elected in Greenacres:


The Post endorses Jonathan Pearce to return to his former seat on the council. Pearce, who last year lost a bid to replace Ferreri as mayor, was a solid contributor as a council member when he wasn’t sparring with Ferreri. With Ferreri gone, the scuffles should be, too.

and. . .

     Incumbent Councilman Anderson Thelusme, who was appointed [unanimously] to the seat when Pearce stepped down to run for mayor [emphasis added], also sees his financial background as a plus for the city as well as representing “voices that are not being heard.”


One could say the editor at the Greenacres Observer has a different take on this race for District 4 in Greenacres:

Incumbent Anderson Thelusem was selected to fill a vacated Council seat. He has done an admirable job, thinking things through and protecting the money of the city. Challenger Jonathan Pearce held the seat and vacated it when he ran a failed campaign for mayor.
     In his terms as a councilman, Pearce squandered tax dollars, depleted reserves, was untruthful from the dais and the list of ill deeds goes on. During his campaign for mayor, he was photographed removing the signs of his opponent. Pearce has displayed enough dishonesty to never be considered for a position in the publics trust.
     Anderson Thulusme is the clear choice for the citizens of Greenacres.

So there you have it. Two different opinions from two different editors about the District 4 race. Once again, your choices in Greenacres next Tuesday, March 13th are:
  • Incumbent Judith Dugo or the challenger Brian Willever.
  • Incumbent Anderson Thelusme or the challenger Jonathan Pearce.

Once again, both the Coastal Observer and the Post endorsed Judith Dugo in next Tuesday’s election. Here‘s what the Observer had to say about Councilwoman Dugo:

Judith Dugo is being challenged by political new comer Brian Willever. Dugo has learned a lot about being a Council person and puts the people first. Her bacground in business (financial manager) helps when it comes to protecting the residents tax dollars.
     Willever sat on the Charter Review committee and has recently become involved with the workings of the City.
     Dugo has earned another term as a Council member and our endorsement.


We’ll find out what the voters decided after the polls close next Tuesday. Stay tuned as they say!

Spread the word: Theft and vandalizing of political yard signs IS A CRIME.


New residents of this City may be alarmed about the blog post below but there’s no reason to be. It’s sort of like a tradition for one side of Lake Worth politics to send out teams on bikes in the dark of night to steal and vandalize political yard signs.

It should be noted these nocturnal teams are completely harmless, except to themselves of course.

However, here is how you should look at this: they wouldn’t be stealing signs of candidates they didn’t think were very strong on Election Day, right? So, it’s actually sort of a compliment to how well some candidates and campaigns are doing when their signs get vandalized or stolen:

For example, the two gentlemen below had quite a lot of their yard signs stolen and vandalized last year.

Click on image to enlarge:
Two guys hanging out at the Midnight Sun Festival last year, Mr. Omari Hardy (left) and Mr. Herman C. Robinson. Following the March 2017 elections they are now Commissioner Omari Hardy and Commissioner Herman C. Robinson.

It’s important to remember:

Stealing and vandalizing political yard signs IS A CRIME. Someone trespassing on your property and stealing YOUR RIGHT TO FREE SPEECH as well.

If yard signs weren’t effective why do you think some put so much time and effort stealing and vandalizing them? The answer is because political signs do workjust not in the way you might think they do. An article in Politico by Eliza Collins (see excerpt below) is a very interesting read and explains why campaign signs are effective.

But first, besides being a crime, stealing signs in the dark of night is someone who is infringing on
your right of Free Speech:
These two were spotted stealing political signs around the Lucerne building in Downtown Lake Worth in March 2015.

So. If your sign gets stolen or vandalized:

Call the PBSO non-emergency number and report it: 561-688-3400. Whoever stole your political sign trespassed on your property and is disrespecting your right to Free Speech. Contact the campaign you are supporting and request another sign.


Other tactics, mind you, are using bolt cutters to cut one of the metal supports to make the sign dangle awkwardly. That also forces the targeted campaign to order more stakes. The stake, by the way, costs more than the sign. And curiously, it seems the ones who always say “listen to the people”, e.g., such as the small and ever-dwindling cabal of Anarchists here in the City of Lake Worth, were the ones always out stealing other “people’s” right to Free Speech? Ironic, isn’t it?

Anyhow, back to the article in Politico: the value in yard signs isn’t to increase an election turnout, their value is getting your name and message to those who will likely be voting on election day. The effect of political signs is small but nonetheless very effective. Here is the excerpt from Politico:

     “We were surprised by these findings, because the conventional wisdom is that lawn signs don’t do much — they’re supposed to be a waste of money and time. Many campaign consultants think that signs preach to the choir’ and not much else,” Coppock [Alex Coppock, co-author of the study cited in Politico] said.
     “The effect is small in terms of percentage points, though the implication is that thousands of voters would have voted for someone else if not for the signs, [emphasis added] Coppock said. “My guess is that part of the reason that the effect is small is because any campaign tactic — signs, ads, mailers, calls, etc — only move people around at the margin. In many ways, it would be strange if the effect were bigger. Imagine a world in which the presence or absence of lawn signs could swing an election by 10 points.

And lastly, almost every year here in the City of Lake Worth comes the call from some quarters to have candidates and campaigns stop using political yard signs. Listen closely the next time you hear that lament and then ask yourself this question: “Why would anyone want to quell completely legal Free Speech in the City of Lake Worth?”

Friday, March 9, 2018

Endorsements for Mayor Pam Triolo and District 1 Commissioner Scott Maxwell
in The Lake Worth Herald this week.


In the City of Lake Worth this is crucially important to remember on Election Day: 

Terms for elected officials have been increased in the City from two to three (3) years. That was done by referendum in March 2017.

And this is very important as well: 

All voters vote for mayor and commissioner in District 1. So therefore, if you reside in Districts 2–4 you will also be voting for mayor and District 1 commissioner in the City for a term ending in March 2021.

FYI: For the map of all four districts in the City of Lake Worth click on this link.


Election Day is next Tuesday, March 13th.
Pick up the print edition (still ¢50!) at the City’s newsstand located at 600 Lake Ave. in the Downtown. Congratulate the shopkeeper, District 3 Commissioner Andy Amoroso, for being re-elected by default; Amoroso had no opposition in this years election season.

Without further ado, the endorsements from the Herald for Mayor Pam Triolo and District 1 Commissioner (and Vice Mayor) Scott Maxwell:

Lake Worth Mayor Pam Triolo has been challenged by Drew Martin. Under Triolo, the city has made solid gains in economic development, green energy, improved streets that had never been improved, infrastructure improvements and has added nearly a half a billion dollars in investments.
     Prior to taking office, the city had not had a single application for new construction permits for several years. Martin, an environmentalist has received his backing from the very people who made up the commissions that had Lake Worth in a standstill and decaying.
     Pam Triolo is the clear choice for Mayor.

     Sarah Malega has challenged Vice-Mayor Scott Maxwell for the District 1 commission seat. Malega, a local business owner has been active in the community and says she wants to do more for the areas in the south and west sides of the city. While Maxwell has been in office, nearly 75 percent of the money spent improving neighborhoods has been spent in District 1. He has had a strong voice in the issues creating what have led to the very reasons we endorse Triolo.
     Malega has good ideas and ambitions, some of which are already in the works. With the momentum in the city moving strong it is not time to stop the train.
     The work of the past six years is coming to fruition and Maxwell should serve one more term to see the work to the finish.


Check back later on for the endorsements in the City of Greenacres. And, as always, Thank You for visiting today.

“The Inimitables”: Mary Lindsey and City Commissioner Andy Amoroso.


But first, before we get to “The Inimitables”, here is the video from last Tuesday’s Pride Flag Raising at City Hall in the ever-welcoming City of Lake Worth:




The word ‘Inimitable’ defined: “incapable of being imitated or copied; surpassing imitation; matchless.”
Photo from the Pride Flag raising at Lake Worth City Hall. Later in the evening at the City Commission meeting Mary was nominated to sit on the City’s Library Board. Commissioner Amoroso earlier this year was re-elected by default to a 3-year term; he had no opposition.


Lot’s of great things happened at the Lake Worth City Commission meeting last Tuesday. Read more about that in this week’s Lake Worth Herald.

Kathie Lee Gifford coming to the City of Lake Worth. News in yesterday’s print edition of The Palm Beach Post.


From the very same beat reporter at The Palm Beach Post who covers the women’s shoes and sneaker beat in the City of Lake Worth, Post reporter Kevin Thompson also features all the latest, breaking news and updates about the exciting and vibrant business scene in the City, e.g., the latest endeavors of Artsy Fartsy Décor & More (see latest news below).

Although the municipal elections are next Tuesday — and whomever gets elected will now serve a three (3) year term instead of two years — the future of our City didn’t make it into yesterday’s print edition. And the errors and omissions in last Tuesday’s paper have still not been corrected either.

Maybe that will happen in next Monday’s Lake Worth Very Very Special Monday Collector Print Edition (LWVVSMCPE).
However, in the paper yesterday on page B3 ‘Local’, above the fold, is this breaking news about the world-famous Kathie Lee Gifford:


Kathie Lee Gifford, the three-time Emmy-winning co-host of the fourth hour of “Today,” will be at Book Cellar on Lake Avenue on Friday [TODAY] from 6 to 7:30 p.m. as part of a “Happy Hour Mingle” to promote her latest book, “The Rock, the Road and the Rabbi.”

Tickets cost $40; what is usually charged for a similar event on Worth Ave. in the Town of Palm Beach. For more information click on this link for the Book Cellar’s website.

If you plan on going to the Book Cellar to see Kathie Lee Gifford and her new book today, please consider this suggestion:

Make a whole event out of it
& visit Artsy Fartsy too!


Get to Downtown Lake Worth early in the afternoon about 3:30 and go visit Artsy Fartsy Décor & More. Artsy Fartsy, or as they say in the art and furniture industry, ”Art Re-imagined” is located at 506 Lucerne Ave. here in the City. But just don’t take too long. Before long Artsy Fartsy will be packing up and leaving town for good.

Why? Artsy Fartsy’s planned move to Clematis St. in West Palm Beach ahead of SunFest didn’t pan out because the rents are much too high so he had to come back to our vibrant and affordable City and come up with another plan. So grab $5 or $8 and head on over to Artsy Fartsy this afternoon!

After your visit to Artsy Fartsy take a stroll through the Cultural Plaza to Lake Ave. and visit one of the City’s iconic restaurants or visit the City’s newsstand located at 601 Lake Ave. to pick up The Lake Worth Herald or scroll through The Cottages of Lake Worth hardcover book, then head on over to the Book Cellar bookstore and afterwards return to the Cultural Plaza for Evening on the Avenues that ends at 10:00!

Let’s take a stroll down memory lane: Happier times at Artsy Fartsy Décor & More.


Below is an interview from early in 2017 with Mr. Brian Schlitz published in a Lake Worth CRA newsletter titled, “Business Highlight: Artsy Fartsy Décor & More”. Mr. Schlitz said,
“Lake Worth’s top business assets are the public officials in place”.

Last year Mr. Schlitz invited me to come visit and take a seat on “The Big Chair”. So I hopped on down to our vibrant and charming Downtown and met and talked with Brian for a bit and then he asked me to take a seat in the big, REALLY BIG, red Adirondack chair in front of his store. To say I was honored is an understatement.

To put the chair in perspective, my shoes are
size 13 and Yours Truly is 6′5″:
Meet Wes! This photo reminds me of the character Edith Ann, played by Lily Tomlin on Laugh-In
in t
he 1960s.

Here are excerpts from the interview with Mr. Schlitz:

Tell us about yourself?
I was born and raised in Staten Island, New York. I came from a large family; my brothers, sister and I longed for a warmer climate and Florida was the answer. After originally making Boca Raton home, I stumbled upon this one of a kind, close knit and charming town of Lake Worth.
What made you choose Lake Worth?
Lake Worth is a very artsy, charming town and the perfect place for a specialized, fun décor store. The locals and tourists, alike, love our pieces and feel right at home.
What do you like best about having your business within the City of Lake Worth?
Lake Worth’s top business assets are the public officials in place, the downtown (two downtown streets running east/west which allows for double the amount of walkability and opportunity).


Thank you Artsy Fartsy for choosing our little City of Lake Worth. Everyone wishes you the best of luck setting up shop in your next beach town!

When you go to the polls next Tuesday
in the City of Lake Worth. . .

Please remember that. . .

“A ‘minor zoning adjustment’
isn’t always so minor when
it happens next door.”


Election Day in the City of Lake Worth
is in five days, March 13th.


“[I]n 2009, the city had more than 2,200 vacant, foreclosed and abandoned properties. With new codes enacted and enforcement improved, there were fewer than 500 in 2017.”
Quote by the editor at The Palm Beach Post, Tuesday, March 6th, 2018.


“He [District 1 Commissioner Scott Maxwell] has had a strong voice in the issues that have led to the very reasons we endorse [Mayor Pam] Triolo. . . . With the momentum in the city moving strong it is not time to stop the train.
     The work of the past six years is coming to fruition and Maxwell should serve one more term to see the work to the finish.”
Quote by the editor at The Lake Worth Herald, Wednesday, March 7th, 2018.


Yes, it’s true. For some time now there have been individuals and groups formed in the City of Lake Worth that want to create more opportunities for artists to work in their neighborhood — within residential, zoned non-commercial areas — in what are called “home occupations”.

And it’s also true that the City of Lake Worth has done a lot of work to tighten up the zoning codes in the meantime. And it’s also true the City is still hard a work “beefing up” the Code Enforcement Dept. and the zoning codes.

And it’s also true that most people don’t care about zoning until they see a sign go up down the street placed there by the City notifying the public about a meeting coming up at the Planning & Zoning Board or the Historic Resource Preservation Board.

So. Maybe you think ‘home occupations’ for artists is not a good idea. Or maybe you think it is a good idea.

But what if that ‘home occupation’ is detailing cars with an artists’ images and there is not enough parking at the location? What if that ‘home occupation’ is an artist’s music heavy with percussion instruments? Or maybe an artist that uses commercial circular saws or a heavy-duty Sawzall® or uses 20–30 cans of spray paint a day with open trays of paint thinner?

Once again. Next Tuesday is Election Day.

Mayor Pam Triolo and District 1 Commissioner Scott Maxwell have been working diligently since 2011 and 2009, respectively, to tighten up the once terribly-managed and out-of-date zoning codes in this City of Lake Worth left over from a prior administration. But do you have any idea what the challengers will do? Sarah Malega is challenging Commissioner Maxwell and Drew Martin is challenging Mayor Triolo.

As was already stated on this blog several times, Drew Martin will do almost anything to get votes and he doesn’t really care how he does it. But Sarah Malega is a different story altogether. She is a very good candidate and has run a very good campaign. But this Election Day next Tuesday is an altogether different story as well. You’ll be voting to give your choice for mayor and District 1 commissioner a three year term on the City Commission, a very big change from years past.

Make your choices wisely. The City’s zoning codes
are just one thing to consider.

Please take a moment to read the two quotes above from the editors at The Palm Beach Post and The Lake Worth Herald once again. And then scroll back down here and read more about when a “minor zoning adjustment” isn’t always so minor, especially when it happens next door.


The “Official Zoning Map” for the City of Lake Worth:
Use this link to the City’s website for Planning & Zoning, Land Development Regulations, helpful links, contact information and much more.

Once again, there are some in the City of Lake Worth who want to allow artists to do their artwork in a neighborhood “home occupation”. But this is something that will need to be treated with serious deliberation, much debate, and charrettes as well. A ‘charrette’ is a “public meeting in which all stakeholders in a project attempt to resolve conflicts and map solutions.”

Once before there was a major effort to create zoned ‘home occupations’ for artists and one could say that effort didn’t go very well. In fact, it all backfired in a very big way and was probably one of the reasons a former City commissioner, Ryan Maier, decided not to run for re-election and another former commissioner, Chris McVoy, PhD, lost his re-election bid in March 2017.

So as you prepare to go and vote next Tuesday and pick who you think is better prepared to take on the zoning code and that elected official who will be in a position to vote on ‘minor adjustments’ to the zoning code that will most certainly impact your neighborhood in this City. . .


Below is a cautionary tale:


How not to go about changing zoning in a city or town — any city or town in the United States — not just here in the City of Lake Worth.

Below are two excerpts from an article that appeared in The Palm Beach Post in March 2016 titled, “Lake Worth: City of art, artists”, and an executive from the Palm Beach County Cultural Council is quoted:

     “We [the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County] looked at their branding and how they [Austin, Texas] leveraged art and culture to develop their own identify and brand,” ■ said. “That could be used as a foundation for city’s brand strategy.”

and. . .

     That’s how Lake Worth wants to be known. The city wants to allow artists to create in their own homes, which would result in a minor zoning adjustment and to the existing occupancy permit process [emphasis added], said.

The key words are “minor zoning adjustment”.

Now let’s take a stroll back:

To mid-2015, when all hell broke loose.

Despite the City Commission’s work in recent years to tighten zoning ordinances, there was and still is in this City public concern over the talk of expanding the definition and allowing more types of home occupations (what some call ‘upzoning’, which confuses the issue even more), especially as it relates to residential property values, increased traffic, and what role code enforcement would have in all this, to name just a few.

The group called the Lake Worth Artist and Cottage Entrepreneurs (ACE) had been promoting the expansion of home occupations and I met with them in early 2015. You can read about that using this link. What I found interesting about ACE was their goal of engaging the public by beginning a community-wide discussion about changing the zoning to attract more artists to this City.

But, for some reason, that never happened.

Instead what they did is try to gain political support through various back channels but not in a very public way with community involvement. Because of that unfortunate decision, all hell proceeded to break loose.

Part of the confusion was created by comparisons way out of scale to such a small city like Lake Worth. For example, former Commissioner McVoy’s mention of Portland, Oregon (and other large cities) just confused and muddled the issue even further. Then there’s always that special place, the mecca for artists working out of their homes, the beacon on the hill and shining example for home occupation proponents everywhere, Key West.

Just one problem. It’s not true.

It is easy to get carried away with what you think a situation may be in another city. The viewpoint you hold may be influenced by anecdotal evidence, word of mouth, tourism advertising, etc. There seemed to be the expectation that Key West would be a thriving home to people working out of their homes in sort of an artists’ Garden of Eden.

Well, I checked their code and Key West is as strict or moreso than Lake Worth’s when it comes to home occupations in residential districts. So the image that some had of Key West’s residential ‘progressive’ artsy mystique was a myth. It’s also easy to not know what is zoned residential and what is commercial if you are just visiting a town and you don’t have a zoning map with you. How many people carry zoning maps around with them?

There were other possible examples around the nation that could have served as models for home occupations, places more in scale and layout to Lake Worth. But I cautioned everyone back then to not get carried away with romantic notions that may not actually be based in reality. I know that can be a challenge here in the charming little City of Lake Worth.

Another former Lake Worth commissioner, Ryan Maier, was one of those proponents of expanding home occupations in this City. However, prior to being elected in 2015 he had much concern for traffic and congestion in his own neighborhood. How one squares expanding the zoning code to allow more artists (one example) to work out of their homes, having deliveries made, clients visit, and possibly adding employees (without additional parking) didn’t make any sense coming from someone who was already worried about congestion and traffic in his neighborhood.

That is what’s called a “disconnect” and why the public became so worried and confused in 2015 and 2016. Zoning, when it’s discussed and debated in a public way, doesn’t have to be confusing. It can also be a great way to educate and engage the public going forward.


And once again . . .
next Tuesday is Election Day.

Please take note: Important information for all political candidates, campaign organizers and volunteer personnel.


If part of your campaign strategy is stealing the political yard signs of your opponent note that Sunday, March 11th at 2:00 a.m. is when Daylight Savings Time begins. So remember to adjust the schedules for your Sign Stealing Teams appropriately.

And remind all your personnel that stealing political campaign signs is serious business and not just for ones average “monkeywrencher” brought in from Sarasota for a few days. Theft and vandalizing of political yard signs IS A CRIME and is taken very seriously by local law enforcement.

And once again, in the interest of public education, Election Day is March 13th. Here is what you, as a member of the public, need to know about political Free Speech. Be very critical of political mailers!

Don’t hesitate to call a candidate or their campaign organization and say, “Liar, Liar, Pants on Fire!”


It’s that time again for the candidates and campaigns to begin sending out political mailers. Go positive? Go negative? How many puppies? Don’t forget the kids. And most importantly, timing is everything!

But! As you’ll find out below, mailers can
also backfire in a very big way.

There’s a lot of leeway and very few rules political mailers have to follow because political speech is FREE SPEECH, protected by the First Amendment. Except for requiring a disclaimer in small 6′ gray-scale type along the bottom below the union bug, “Political advertisement paid for. . .”, little else is required on a political mailer delivered to your mailbox.

Do they have to be true? No. Do mailers
even have to be factual? No.

Often though, mailers follow the logical fallacy,

A and B so therefore, C (see image below)

For example,

“Amoroso sent $5 million to an industrial park”
“. . . neighborhood roads fall to ruin”
Vote for . Don’t vote for Andy Amoroso.

This is an actual mailer sent out just prior
to the elections in March 2016.
Learn more about this mailer using this link.
This will go down as likely the silliest mailer in
Lake Worth political history. It was called
the “$5 million mystery”.

A few days after this mailer was dropped in mailboxes is when the fun started and people started asking things like, “Where’s Waldo?” about the $5 million. One of the jokes was Commissioner Amoroso buried the mystery money in the Park of Commerce, stuffing it down a Gopher tortoise hole. There were a lot of other funny jokes, too.

A week after this political mailer was sent out Amoroso went on to win his re-election by a huge landslide. And for several weeks afterward this “$5 million mystery” continued to draw laughs.

And the latest is. . .

Two years later Amoroso was unopposed in his 2017/2018 re-election bid. No one stepped up to challenge him and he’ll serve another term on the City Commission. However this time, following the referendum that passed in March 2017, Amoroso will serve a 3 year term instead of two years as it had been previously.

The lesson is this, political mailers can
backfire in a big way.

“Leading the Fight to Lower Electric Bills”?
In an ironic twist, because electric rates continued to spike after Cara Jennings was re-elected in 2008,
a lot of people switched over to clean, affordable,
and the Green choice: Natural Gas (for cooking,
drying clothes, and hot water too).

In conclusion. . .

Have you thought about natural gas service for your home? Call 888-765-4601 to contact Florida Public Utilities or use this link and “Ask4Gas”.

Thursday, March 8, 2018

TODAY at 4:00. “Boutwell Road Groundbreaking Ceremony”.

Boutwell Rd. is in the City of Lake Worth’s
Park of Commerce (POC).

Thank You for visiting the Lake Worth City Limits blog today, “Notes, News and Reviews unique to City and suburban areas.”

The POC has been an oft-told topic addressed quite frequently on this blog since 2006. However, there are many new and recently-new residents of this City who don’t know much about the long history of this area located within this little 6-square-mile City of Lake Worth.

I would strongly encourage everyone to read the blog post that follows this one (or click on this link) and hope to see a big turnout next week at this groundbreaking, one many of us have been waiting for a very, very long time.


Press/news media. Your contact is Mr. Ben Kerr, the City’s Public Information Officer (PIO): 561-586-1631; email: bkerr@lakeworth.org
The Boutwell Rd. Groundbreaking Ceremony will be held at the north-west corner of 4th Ave. North and Boutwell Rd. today (March 8th) at 4:00.*

The press release:

This project has been funded by an impressive EDA grant of $1,389,100 and will significantly improve Boutwell Road and make the Lake Worth Park of Commerce an even more attractive site for business growth.
     Mayor Pam Triolo along with members of the City Commission, City Management Team and Project Participants will be present to celebrate the start of this important project.
     Please contact Ben Kerr, the City of Lake Worth’s PIO, with any questions or comments.


*Located in Central Palm Beach County, Lake Worth is a dynamic, multi-cultural city with an individualistic style. People are drawn to the City by its acceptance of different cultures and lifestyles, historic districts, hip downtown and colorful arts district:

We are LAKE WORTH. A hometown City that is committed to delivering the highest level of customer service through a commitment to integrity, hard work and a friendly attitude. We strive to exceed the expectations of our citizens, our businesses, our elected officials and our fellow employees.”

The “Urban Chicken” in this City of Lake Worth is getting cooked.

With the looming elections on March 13th, just
16 days away, this would make for an interesting candidate question: “What is your position
on the urban chicken?”

If you didn’t know, our Urban Chicken groupies here in the City of Lake Worth always held up the City of Stuart as forward-thinking and on the cutting edge of “backyard chickens”. Well, there was very bad news last year for the all the fans of backyard chickens from Stuart, news from the TCPalm:

“No backyard chickens in Stuart after one commissioner rescinds support”


STUART — In late June, residents of single-family homes were told they could have up to two backyard chickens.
     That’s no longer the case.
     Commissioner Jeffrey Krauskopf on July 10 backtracked his approval, tipping the scale against backyard chickens, which had been narrowly approved last month.

Let’s take a look back. History of the ‘urban chicken’ here in our little City of Lake Worth.

Thankfully, this was an idea a former Lake Worth City commissioner kept “cooped” up: The Urban Chicken.

First, is raising chickens legal in the City? No. Raising chickens, aka “Urban Chickens” IS NOT allowed in the City Lake Worth.

Do you have a “chicken problem” in your neighborhood? Contact the Citys Code Enforcement.
Image from the Lake Worth Chickens Facebook page which then-citizen Ryan Maier founded. Mr. Maier later became District 4 Commissioner Maier in 2015 and opted not to run for re-election in March 2017.

The Urban Chicken idea is not a new one. In 2009 the City came very close to allowing chickens, ducks, and bees to be farmed for ‘personal’ use. If you can believe it, there was even a mayoral candidate (Rachel Waterman) who thought the Park of Commerce would be great for a large chicken breeding/egg production facility.

For some perspective, here is a blog post from the inimitable Tom McGow on April 18, 2009 titled, tongue-in-cheek, Farm Living Is The Life For Me. . . In the image below from Mr. McGow’s blog, notice item ‘C’ from the Lake Worth City Commission agenda back then:
 
“. . . fowl ordinance to permit chickens”

Then-commissioner Cara Jennings (2006–2010) was a big proponent of raising chickens. Below is one of Tom McGow’s classic photoshops, note the image of Cara Jennings (top right).

It’s funny but not really. Chickens in an urban environment are a major public health issue, especially so for young children.

Besides chickens needing much maintenance and coop cleaning, chickens spread viruses/bacteria and also attract predators. Raising poultry in an urban environment is a serious public health issue. In a City that is still plagued with blighted properties it doesn’t need one more thing to regulate. In fact, chickens are out of the hen house already as many readers can attest by sightings in their neighborhoods.

Why the big deal about raising chickens in Lake Worth besides the health, safety, and code issues? Because it’s a really bad idea that just won’t go away. Even after all these years there are still some in the City that want to make it legal to raise chickens in their backyard on the pretense that eggs are too expensive at Publix. Below are excerpts from a 2011 Post article about the “clandestine chicken army” that still struts.

     “There’s a whole clandestine chicken army out there,” said former City Commissioner Cara Jennings, who mother-henned the 2009 effort but is lying low this time.

and. . . 

     Freelance hairstylist Ryan Maier, 31, started a Facebook group called Lake Worth Chickens recently because of his interest in growing his own food.
     “I had never been on Facebook,” he said. But I saw what was going on in Egypt, so I decided to do something. [emphasis added]

Thankfully, the anti-chicken forces rallied. . .

     The anti-chicken organizer, Karri Casper, wrote that Lake Worth Chickens is just a subversive effort to stop development of the city and turn Lake Worth into farmland.
     “This is another plot from the Anarchists to distract us from the critical issues at hand,” the group’s Facebook page says. “For criminy sakes, this is NOT a rural area.

It would be reassuring if — once and for all — the urban chicken idea gets cooked for good. Especially considering all the important issues that face this City such as infrastructure, potholes, and fixing all our sidewalks. So. How to ‘cook’ the “Urban Chicken” idea once and for all?

At one the upcoming neighborhood candidate debates prior to the elections on March 13th ask all the candidates this question:


“What is your position on the
‘Urban Chicken’?”

Wednesday, March 7, 2018

Several errors and omissions in The Palm Beach Post yesterday. Was there a correction issued today? Of course not.


In the Post endorsements published yesterday in the print edition, the editor duly noted the major successes here in the City of Lake Worth. That was good to see acknowledged in the Post.

But along with that good news there were several errors and omissions that needed to be corrected and/or clarified in today’s print edition.

But of course, as you all know, the Post rarely publishes “Corrections and Clarifications” especially when it comes to errors published about the City of Lake Worth. See some of latest errors and omissions published in the Post below.

First, the good news.

On the ballot next Tuesday, March 13th.

City of Lake Worth Mayor Pam Triolo
and District 1 Commissioner Scott Maxwell:
The editor wrote, “Long-neglected streets, water and sewer lines have at last begun to be upgraded thanks to a voter-approved $40 million bond issue. A solar farm is producing 2 megawatts of power on a former landfill . . .” and editor went on to note:

“[T]he city had more than 2,200 vacant, foreclosed and abandoned properties. With new codes enacted and enforcement improved, there were fewer than 500 in 2017. Crime rates, fueled by the heroin epidemic, too, have improved. The latest figures for the first six months of last year show a 13 percent drop.”


Now for the ‘bad news’ published by the editor, what should have been corrected in today’s print edition, but wasn’t.

Mayor Pam Triolo wasn’t first elected in 2009. She was first elected in 2011. And there is more:
  • It was falsely stated by the editor that “Incumbent Scott Maxwell, 59, has held this [District 1] seat for nine continuous years, and for two years before that.” November 2009 would be 8 years and 4 months ago; not “nine continuous years”. Maxwell was re-elected to the Lake Worth City Commission a second time in Nov. 2009 (and re-elected twice more).
  • However, after false reporting Mayor Triolo was first elected in 2009, it was accurately stated later by the editor that Mayor Pam Triolo has been mayor for “nearly 6½ years” [Why is that? In 2013, by referendum, elections were moved from November back to March in the City of Lake Worth which explains the nearly “½ years”].
  • Also, in a not-so-clever swipe at the Lake Worth Electric Utility the editor wrote, “the city-owned utility’s notoriously high electric bills are dropping a bit.” However, the Post’s “news partner” at NBC5/WPTV reported on Feb. 6th that, “In a brief press conference at city hall [Mayor Pam] Triolo said under this new agreement electric bills for residents in Lake Worth will be drastically lower.”
  • And also not mentioned in the endorsements — and it should have been reported by the editor — terms for elected officials were increased from two to three years by referendum in March 2017. This is very significant and it is anyone’s guess why this was not noted in the Post, a ‘paper of record’ in Palm Beach County.

And along with the errors and omissions in the endorsements published yesterday there was another error that had nothing to do with politics.

In ‘Local’ news in the ‘B’ section was this news report titled:
“LAKE WORTH — Annual rescue groups kick off adoption event”

This event in Downtown Lake Worth was to highlight, “adoptable dogs, cats, puppies and kittens, as well as ‘Name Your Price’ adoptions special for all approved adopters and giveaways.”

This event in Downtown Lake Worth was held last Saturday, March 3rd which was three (3) days before the ‘news’ was published in the Post.

Oooops.

Tuesday, March 6, 2018

“LAKE WORTH — Annual rescue groups kick off adoption event”


In The Palm Beach Post today (March 6th) on page B3 of the ‘Local’ section is an article promoting an event that is apparently already over and done with. Further confusing in the news today published in the Post, there is no date or time given for this event in the City of Lake Worth.

However, according to the North Shore Animal League America’s TOUR FOR LIFE website, “The world’s largest cooperative lifesaving adoption event”, this event was already held last Saturday, March 3rd; three days ago in the City:

Highlights include adoptable dogs, cats, puppies and kittens, as well as “Name Your Price” adoptions special for all approved adopters and giveaways.

This is a “Staff Report” so there is no reporter to contact. But to try and get this news updated or clarified you can try calling the news dept. at 561-820-4401 or send an email to: breakingnews@pbpost.com

From editor at The Palm Beach Post: One endorsement today and one coin flip.

But first. . .


Please note: There is an error in the Post today. It’s falsely stated that “Incumbent Scott Maxwell, 59, has held this [District 1] seat for nine continuous years, and for two years before that.” Maxwell was re-elected to the Lake Worth City Commission a second time in Nov. 2009 (and re-elected twice more).
     November 2009 would be 8 years and 4 months ago; not nine continuous years”. A small error but one that needs to be corrected in the print edition tomorrow.
     However, it is accurately stated that Mayor Pam Triolo has been mayor for nearly 6½ years”. Why is that? In 2013, by referendum, elections were moved from November back to March in the City of Lake Worth which explains the nearly ½ years”. 
     Also, in a clever swipe at the Lake Worth Electric Utility the editor writes, “the city-owned utilitys notoriously high electric bills are dropping a bit.” However, the Post’s news partner at NBC5/WPTV reported on Feb. 6th that,
“In a brief press conference at city hall [Mayor Pam] Triolo said under this new agreement electric bills for residents in Lake Worth will be drastically lower.”
     And also not mentioned in the Post today — and it should have been reported by the editor — terms for elected officials was increased from two to three years by referendum in March 2017. This is very significant and it is anyones guess why this was not noted in this ‘paper of record’. 
     Thank You for your patience. Without further ado lets address the issue at hand. . .
 

First the endorsement and later about the “coin flip”.


The editor at the Post endorsed Mayor Pam Triolo for re-election. Triolo’s opponent is Drew Martin. Martin’s campaign strategy is to throw as much stuff at the wall and see what sticks: myths, mis- and disinformation. His only goal is to secure votes. Period. And he could care less how he gets those votes.

Unfortunately, the race for mayor here in the
City of Lake Worth could have been
an exciting one this year.

It could have been a true battle of ideas.

But for some reason Chris McVoy, PhD got cold feet and decided not to take on Mayor Pam Triolo. McVoy always wanted to run for mayor and this year was his last and best chance. He first ran in 2010, got re-elected twice, and got booted out of office in March of last year. But he still has a lot of name recognition and that could have been a big boost to help shed that “gadfly” label, ingloriously bestowed upon him by the editor at the Post in early March 2017.

So instead of an interesting and lively race between Mayor Triolo and McVoy (the former commissioner in District 2), we instead end up with Drew Martin after what seemed like an exhaustive search through that mucky talent pool all the way down to the bottom. Two years ago journalist Dierdra Funcheon went on a search for “The 19 Best Environmentalists in South Florida” and she found two worthy environmentalists right here in the City of Lake Worth: Chris McVoy, PhD and Mr. Panagiotis Evangellos Nasios Tsolkas.

Drew Martin didn’t make the list of the “19 Best Environmentalists”. He was never even mentioned.

Anyhow, the election for mayor this year was a huge loss for the public here in this City. In what could have been a true battle for the hearts and minds of voters we end up with Drew Martin who hasn’t had a fresh idea in ten years at least. At least two or three times the Post has published a line like this,

“He [Martin] ran unsuccessfully for the County Commission two years ago.”

Partly true.

“[R]an unsuccessfully”?
Drew Martin got clobbered two years ago.
Now he’s got his eyes on a smaller prize: mayor of the City of Lake Worth. The Post endorsement of Mayor Pam Triolo for re-election was short
and summed up nicely with this line:
She’s earned that chance.

So. The editor at the Post made one endorsement in the paper today.

Now to the “coin flip”.

The editor endorsed Sarah Malega for commissioner in District 1. But it was really a “coin flip” and
here’s why:

Let’s revisit the Post endorsement that is also in today’s print edition. From Mayor Pam Triolo’s endorsement for mayor of Lake Worth:

In the nearly 6½ years that Pam Triolo has been mayor, Lake Worth’s taxable valuation has risen from a total of $990 million to $1.6 billion.
     Long-neglected streets, water and sewer lines have at last begun to be upgraded thanks to a voter-approved $40 million bond issue. A solar farm is producing 2 megawatts of power on a former landfill, one reason the city-owned utility’s notoriously high electric bills are dropping a bit. “We’re now 18 cents cheaper than FPL for residential,” she boasts.
     Now that these and other projects are underway, Triolo says, “I’d like to see that they get done, and done properly.” She’s earned that chance.


Now pause here momentarily.

Think about District 1 Commissioner Scott Maxwell’s 9½ years on the City Commission and then go back and read the three paragraphs above but switch out “Pam Triolo” for Scott Maxwell. . .


In the nearly [8]½ years that [Scott Maxwell] has been [District 1 commissioner] Lake Worth’s taxable valuation has risen from a total of $990 million to $1.6 billion.
     Long-neglected streets, water and sewer lines have at last begun to be upgraded thanks to a voter-approved $40 million bond issue. A solar farm is producing 2 megawatts of power on a former landfill . . . Now that these and other projects are underway. . .

Basically, the editor endorsed Sarah Malega because Scott Maxwell has been on the City Commission two (2) years longer the Mayor Triolo? And the editor thinks,

It’s time he [Maxwell] made way for a challenger with fresher ideas.

Just wondering, how long has the editor at the Post been the editor at the Post? Is it time for some “fresher ideas” at that newspaper? One would think the answer is “Yes” since The Palm Beach Post was put up For-Sale last year.

But anyhow.

The reason this ‘endorsement’ is not really an endorsement — but rather a coin flip — is a case that is actually made by the editor at the Post. The editor writes,

“Sarah Malega, 42, is a gym owner, personal auto shopper and neighborhood activist who said she twice voted for Maxwell, only to be disappointed in his [Maxwell’s] responses to such intensely local problems as run-down properties [emphasis added] and too-few stop signs.”

Gee wiz. If only Commissioner Maxwell had a few more stop signs installed. Note that in the endorsement for Mayor Pam Triolo the editor writes,

“When she [Mayor Triolo] took office in 2009, the city had more than 2,200 vacant, foreclosed and abandoned properties. With new codes enacted and enforcement improved, there were fewer than 500 in 2017.”

Is the editor suggesting Mayor Triolo accomplished this all by herself? Doesn’t District 1 Commissioner Scott Maxwell deserve some credit too?

But credit goes to Sarah Malega for getting the Post endorsement. She made her case and she made her case well. But one wonders why the endorsement wasn’t much stronger for Malega.

And lastly, ‘back in the day’ a Post endorsement would garner a candidate 6–8% more votes on Election Day. But now that number is closer to 3–4%.

Three to four percentage points doesn’t seem like a lot when going up against an incumbent like Scott Maxwell. But last year another challenger was up against an incumbent and the challenger’s name was Mr. Omari Hardy. Mr. Hardy is now District 2 Commissioner Omari Hardy. Who was the incumbent?

The incumbent who lost on March 14th, 2017 was none other than Chris McVoy, PhD. McVoy lost by about 3–4%. So just a few more votes can make all the difference in the world, errr, I mean in the City of Lake Worth.

TAKE NOTE:
Election Day this year is on Tuesday, March 13th!

This is a door-hanger from last year:
Hopefully, if Sarah Malega does get elected the next District 1 commissioner, she’ll thank Commissioner Scott Maxwell for all his hard work and accom-
plishments over the last 9½ years.

For Sarah Malega and Commissioner Scott Maxwell the next step is Election Day and a three year term on the Lake Worth City Commission.

Best wishes to both of you.

Table Talk: “Another outstanding FREE program” in the City of Lake Worth.

Get Registered today!
Tonight is another community and family ‘Talk’ around the table. More details are below.

Register today to get your family a seat at the table, “Bringing Families Together” to talk about recent news in The Lake Worth Herald. “Table Talk” continues until March 20th but if the community interest and attendance remains high it’s very possible this free program will continue on past March.

To register call Miriam at 561-899-1652.
Please note and show your support for the
sponsors
(see below) of this family event.

“Another outstanding FREE program conceived and organized by Cindy Ruth Ansell, the Lake Worth Children’s Librarian: families are invited to come for dinner and a discussion. Each evening a different topic based on articles in The Lake Worth Herald (Lake Worth’s oldest business) will be read aloud during dinner and then discussed.
     Each family will be joined with a bi-lingual facilitator at their table to keep the conversations lively! Bringing back a wonderful tradition of families reading together and sharing interesting news in the community. Special Thanks to all the generous sponsors for making this happen!”

Sponsored by:

“Lake Worth’s Oldest Established Business —
Established in 1912”
To see the recent front page of the
Herald use this link.