Saturday, August 24, 2019

Prayers and insight from “The Interfaith Prayer Book”, expanded 2nd edition, published in 2014.


The Interfaith Prayer Book was compiled by Lake Worth resident Ted Brownstein and the Lake Worth Interfaith Network (LWIN). Learn more about this organization at the end of this blog post.

From p. 31 by Siddur Avodas HaLev titled,
“A Jewish View of Prayer”:


“Prayer: Its Hebrew name is, tefillah, a word that gives us an insight into the Torah’s concept of prayer. The root of tefillah means to judge, to differentiate, to clarify, to decide. In life, we constantly sort out evidence from rumor, valid options from wild speculations, fact from fancy. Thus, prayer is the soul’s yearning to define what truly matters and to ignore the trivialities that often masquerade as essential.”


From p. 69, the “Hymn of the Good Samaritan”:


From every race and land,
The victim of our day,
Abused and hurt by human hands,
Are wounded on life’s way.

The priest and Levite* pass
And find not time to wait.
The pressing claims of living call;
They leave them to their fate.

But one of different faith
To care he felt compelled.
His active love like Jesus’ own
Uplifted, healed and held.

May this example lead,
Inspire and teach us all
That we may find in others’ faith
The God on whom we call.


From p. 23 in the chapter titled, “Native American Prayer” is the ancient reading from the Popul Vuh, a region in South America now called Guatemala:


Make my guilt vanish,
Heart of Sky, Heart of Earth;
Grant me a favor,
Give me strength, give me courage
In my heart, in my head,
Since you are my mountain and my plain;
May there be no falsehood and no stain,
And may this reading of the Popul Vuh
Come out clear as dawn,
And may the sifting of ancient times
Be complete in my heart, in my head;
And make my guilt vanish,
My grandmothers, grandfathers,
And however many souls of the dead there may be,
You who speak with the Heart of Sky and Earth,
May all of you together give strength
To the reading I have undertaken.


To learn more about the “Reading of Popul Vuh” in The Interfaith Prayer Book and the Ancient History Encyclopedia click on this link.

The Lake Worth Interfaith Network (LWIN) is “[A] group of individuals and faith-based communities dedicated to promoting acceptance and understanding among our diverse spiritual traditions through devotions, education and compassionate action. . . . LWIN hopes that sharing our experience will be helpful to other communities who desire to create similar local interfaith organizations.”


*Levite: “[M]ember of the tribe of Levi; descendant of Levi, especially one appointed to assist the priests in the temple or tabernacle.” Learn more at Wikipedia.

Friday, August 23, 2019

Pier at the beach in Lake Worth Beach is named in honor of William O. Lockhart, a former commissioner.


William Osborne Lockhart was the former pier master who passed away in 2003: “[I]t was the city’s pier that Lockhart spent many years of his life.”


The news below is from July 2003 by long-time South Florida editor and reporter Kari Barnett.

Click on image to enlarge:

Newspaper clipping from the Lake Worth Forum dated July 8th, 2003. The Forum is published by the Sun Sentinel for distribution in Palm Beach County.

The caption beneath the photo reads in part:


The pier at Lake Worth Beach, first opened in 1954, was recently renamed by the city commission for long-time activist William O. Lockhart, who died in April at age 71.

Article continues on p. 6 . . . three excerpts:


“William Lockhart was a friend of society and a proud member of this city,” said Paul Martin, who was overcome with emotion at the unanimous vote [July 1st, 2008 at City Commission] to change the name.
     Martin, along with others in Lake Worth, started a grassroots campaign months ago to raise funds to pay for the lettering on a new sign showing that the pier is named in Lockhart’s honor.

and. . .


     Along with his charitable efforts, Lockhart was a city commissioner in the late 1980s who attended many meetings around the city’s neighborhoods.
     After retiring from his city job in 1991, Lockhart was a volunteer with the Lake Worth Citizens on Patrol and was president of Lake Worth Citizens on Task.
     But it was the city’s pier that Lockhart spent many years of his life.

and the article concludes. . .


     Commissioner Nadine Burns took time at the end of last week’s commission meeting to recall what she thought Lockhart meant to the City of Lake Worth.
     “I was cleaning out one of the file cabinets here at city hall and I realized William Lockhart was one of the most repeated names,” Burns said.
     “We did a good thing tonight.”


The William O. Lockhart Pier was one of the sites visited by writer Lori Durante* of the Museum of Lifestyle & Fashion History in a blog post dated Oct. 2012 titled, “Black Bahamian descendants from Miami tour historic Lake Worth”. According to Durante former Palm Beach Post reporter Willie Howard provided research on Lockhart’s ancestry.

Another stop on the tour was the St. John’s Episcopal Church in the City of Lake Worth: “Lake Osborne Addition was once Lake Osborne ‘Colored’ Addition that was settled around 1917 by black Bahamians.” Durante then states that in 1999 the City deleted the derogatory term ‘Colored’ from City plat maps.

Durante’s tour also visited the Grant AME Chapel, “[E]stablished in 1922 and is the oldest black church in Lake Worth. The church organization originated in the neighboring Town of Lantana.”

More history about the William O. Lockhart Pier: the hurricanes of 2004–2005.


After the pier was renamed in 2003 and according to reporter Kari Barnett some thought the name change would be “confusing for some visitors” and others wanted the name to remain the “Lake Worth Pier” a much bigger issue came along in September 2004. What no one could have predicted and very few were prepared for: hurricanes Frances and Jeanne and then Wilma visited the very next year.

Here is news from 2006 as reported by Palm Beach Post staff writer Nicole Janok on, “Lake Worth moving to rebuild pier”.

“The $2.8 million project is slated to begin in January and take approximately 10 months”.


LAKE WORTH — Longtime surfer James Linkins remembers the days when Lake Worth Beach had sandbars that produced killer waves. But ever since Hurricanes Frances and Jeanne destroyed the William O. Lockhart Municipal Pier two years ago [2004], the waves haven’t been the same.”

Newspaper clipping from October 28th, 2006.

Click on image to enlarge:

On Sept. 4th, 2004, Hurricane Frances pummeled Lake Worth — then two weeks later we got hit by Hurricane Jeanne — winds estimated 120 mph. Then along came Wilma in 2005. Fast forward to 2009. . .


The William O. Lockhart Municipal Pier held its grand reopening on May 9th, 2009 and Lockhart has kept his place in City of Lake Worth history.



*Does the name Lori Durante sound familiar? It should. Durante is one of Lake Worth’s greatest ambassadors. She was featured in an article by Palm Beach Post business reporter Jennifer Sorentrue:


Delray Beach resident Lori Durante launched Taste History Culinary Tours in 2011, combining the idea of a narrated bus tour with the growing popularity of food tastings.
     She started the venture in Delray Beach, and then added tours in Boynton Beach, Lantana, Lake Worth [emphasis added], and West Palm Beach’s Northwood Village neighborhood and Arts and Entertainment District.

“. . .look. . . it’s a pool again!”


Newspaper clipping from April 2008.

Click on image to enlarge:

Next time you and your family go to the beach look at that space south of the Casino and wonder, “When will that space not be a pool again?” Why cant it be a skate park? An outside theater? Why is Lake Worth Beach always left ‘holding the water’ for the Town of Palm Beach?

Tuesday, August 20, 2019

Palm Tran bus Rt. 62 is returning to the beach in Lake Worth Beach!


Mayor Pam Triolo and Vice Mayor Andy Amoroso have been working very hard for a very long time to bring back the public bus service to the public ocean beach and with the City agreeing to commit 250K to alter the traffic infrastructure and construct a new bus stop/shelter both the County Commission and Palm Tran are on board with the plan as well.

This information about extending bus Rt. 62 was provided by Public Works Dir. Jamie Brown at the work session last evening on discussion of sales tax proceeds (see video below).

Rt. 62 serves Wellington, Greenacres, Palm Springs, Palm Beach State College and all areas in between on Lake Worth Rd. In Lake Worth Beach the bus makes the turnaround on Dixie Hwy. near City Hall (except on Sundays when the turnaround is at Golfview Rd. just west of the Robert Harris Bridge). To download the existing Rt. 62 map and schedules click on this link. Connections with Rt. 62 are routes 1 (serving Dixie Hwy.), 40, 43, 46, 52, 61, 63, and 64.

With a new Palm Tran bus stop at the beach in LWB many more from the public will have public access to the ocean, e.g., Royal Palm Beach and West Palm Beach of which neither municipality actually has a beach for their residents to enjoy.

Two hundred and fifty thousand dollars according to Dir. Brown is the very high end of the cost estimate and he believes the cost to the City will be much lower. Changes will have to made to widen the circle traffic flow at the north corner of the Casino building and then the bus will proceed west off the dune towards A1A to a dedicated bus stop with a shelter and retaining wall next to the County’s Kreusler Park.

Mayor Triolo sees a huge benefit for the City in promoting a bus service to the beach and she explains so in the video. This discussion lasts just about ten minutes and strongly encourage everyone interested in public transportation to hear the entire discussion:


“That’s a whopping figure and stands out like Madonna at a convent.”


“Code Violations Real Shocker”


Remember this “$21 Million Outstanding” next time you read another one of those verbose, repetitive, and tiresome stories from the usual suspects about our Code Enforcement Dept. here in the City of Lake Worth Beach.


Click on image to enlarge.

Commentary published in The Lake Worth Herald, May 23rd, 2002.

“Pride should kick in at some point and help clean up this mess.

*Adjusted for inflation, $29.5M in 2019.

Monday, August 19, 2019

Elected leaders setting the bar high in Greenacres: Making education, families and children a high priority.


Just recently we learned the City Council led by the honorable Mayor Joel Flores and the administration in the City of Greenacres deserve a lot of credit for creating one of the best After School and camp programs in the United States and the honor of receiving Florida Gold Seal Designation as well. Here is recent news published on the front page in the Coastal and Greenacres Observer headlined, “Greenacres After School Program Receives National Accreditation”:


The Council on Accreditation (COA) has proudly recognized the City of Greenacres After School and Camp Programs (a licensed, year-round, K-12 grade program) as an outstanding provider.

National accreditation demonstrates that the program successfully implements high performance standards and delivers the highest quality services to all of its children, youth and families. In addition to this achievement, the City of Greenacres After School Program was expedited through the Pre-Commission Review Report (PCR) process as a result of not receiving any out of compliance ratings in any of the fundamental practice or core standards.

The assessors were extremely impressed with the City’s operations, extended learning and enrichment programs, community partnerships and resources available. They travel all over and country, and even internationally, and claimed it was one of the best programs they have ever assessed.

COA accreditation allows the City to obtain the Florida Gold Seal Designation, that provides for a higher per child/per day, rate of reimbursement, from the Early Learning Coalition. For more information on the program visit the City’s website at www.greenacresfl.gov or call 561-642-2193.

The COA is an independent not-for-profit international accreditor providing a full continuum of community-based behavioral health care and human service organizations.

Congratulations to the City of Greenacres!


To learn more about the City of Greenacres click on this link.

And in other recent news Greenacres reopened their renovated gymnasium at the City’s Community Center at 501 Swain Blvd. You can learn more about that on the Greenacres official Facebook page.

For more information about all the public parks in Greeenacres, including helpful maps and directions, click on this link.

The Coastal and Greenacres Observer is a FREE weekly publication published by the Lake Worth Herald Press, Inc. To download the Observer click on this link and then use the Options tab to download the PDF. For more information contact the editor at 561-585-9387 or send an email to: Editor@lwherald.com

“A Riddle”. Poem by poet unknown. Guest at Gulfstream Hotel. Lake Worth, Florida. 1963.


           “ A lake ~ and swinging palm trees,

                                      The Ocean ~ deep and green ~ ”



Click on image to enlarge:
The image above is from the 2015 Coastal Observer series about the history of the Gulfstream Hotel. The first issue was titled, “Dog Days and Glory Days”.

From that series, a poem. . .


. . . can you guess My riddle?*


Some folks, they like a riddle,
Now here is one for you.
It’s square, not deep, but open
Soft breezes blowing through.

Beyond the sky is lovely,
While clouds go sailing o’er.
I hear the call of song birds,
A distant train’s low roar.

A lake ~ and swinging palm trees,
The Ocean ~ deep and green ~
Now can you guess My riddle?
It’s my window ~ at Gulf Stream



*Poem about the Gulfstream Hotel from December, 1963 titled, “A Riddle”, written anonymously by a visitor to the hotel. Poem reprinted in the Coastal/Greenacres Observer (publisher: Lake Worth Herald) on October 29th, 2015.

Every Wednesday at Brogues in Lake Worth Beach: Weekly meeting of Rotary.


The Rotary has been serving and continues to serve the Lake Worth region for over 90 years.

Question: What are you doing
this coming Wednesday at noon?

Front cover from the 50th anniversary of Rotary.

 

“The Lake Worth Rotary always has their doors open to new membership. If you are interested in becoming a Rotarian, please don’t be shy and come visit us.”


We meet at Brogues DownUnder for lunch every Wednesday (621 Lake Ave., LWB). It is always an honor to have a new guest to share a joyful experience including a beautiful lunch while our weekly guest speaker shares productive information regarding current events. We want our guests to feel comfortable and among friends.


Here are two more images from the 50th Anniversary publication in 1977.


Two more images (click on to enlarge):

Inside the front cover.

And. . .

An advertisement in the book.

Heeding the advice below can save you a lot of time, money, and effort.


Are you considering a new project here in Lake Worth Beach? Or are you considering a renovation? A new restaurant? A new retail opportunity?

If so, you need to learn about the Neighborhood Assoc. Presidents’ Council (NAPC). Find out
more about the NAPC below.


They can help you engage the neighborhood and the public prior to or even after approaching the City staff with your idea. The NAPC can help you engage the neighbors and neighborhood, provide as much information available at the time to the public, and maybe even quell the rumor mill from churning out one rumor after another.

How do I know this can actually be accomplished? Because there is a lot of proof that this approach works. Use this link for just one example:


The Planning and Zoning Board approved the site plan unanimously and recommended the rezoning request be approved by the City Commission. These approvals were made with conditions which addressed many of the issues which had been discussed between the developer, the City and the neighborhood beforehand.


In the excerpt above, the words ‘and the neighborhood beforehand’ are what one needs to focus on.

So “beforehand” consider approaching the NAPC. What you’ll discover is that sometimes the neighborhood understands their neighborhood much better than the City does. For the NAPC website click on this link, for their Facebook page use this link, or send an email to: napcinfo@gmail.com