Saturday, September 29, 2018

October will usher in very big changes to the City of Lake Worth.


One is the change in recycling methods and the other one hasn’t gotten the attention of the press and news media. Yet. A very big change is coming to Code Enforcement: Slumlords Beware.

And expect the ‘G’ word to be resurrected once again. Below is much more information about that.

Another item of note. The scheduled City Commission meeting on Tuesday, Oct. 2nd has been cancelled. The next regular meeting of the Commission will now be held on Oct. 16th. Now to big changes coming to this City and. . .

Starting on Monday, October 1st: Expect to see a lot of press and news media in this little City.


The City is switching from single- to dual-stream recycling. One of the publishing leaders of industry news about recycling in the U.S. is called Waste Dive. Journalist Katie Pyzyk’s news datelined Sept. 4th is headlined, “Lake Worth, Florida reverting to dual-stream collection next month”.

Despite all the information coming from the City and the Solid Waste Authority (SWA) about the change in recycling methods there will always be those who are not informed, for any number of reasons, or maybe they were informed and then claim they weren’t. But regardless, those are the people the press and news media will be attracted to, with scenes galore of people dragging those new 18-gallon bins out to the street like they were each three hundred pound boulders.

There is also a major change coming to the City’s Code Enforcement Dept. as well. For about Code Enforcement below is much more information about what happened at the City Commission meeting held on September 20th and also watch a portion of the YouTube video from that meeting (at end of blog post).

That this information about Code Enforcement and Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funding has gone unreported in The Palm Beach Post is nothing short of incredible. For example, one recent story in the Post was that old tired distraction about medical marijuana dispensaries. Enough already.

Take note slumlords in this City: October will
usher in very big changes for you.


And expect those slumlords to fight back. And hard. Expect the ‘G’ word to come back with a frenzy. Those slumlords have their allies to protect them. Who are those allies? They are the ones also making tons of money off disgraceful, unsafe and dilapidated properties. The ‘G’ word of course is “gentrification”. If you wish, after reading this blog post scroll back up and read about “the politics of fear” an oft-used tactic in this City.

What happened at the Commission
meeting on September 20th.


At the beginning of the Commission meeting Commissioner Omari Hardy made a request to pull Item B off the Consent Agenda and it was moved to New Business. Item B on Consent was:


Resolution No. 57-2018 - Community Development Block Grant Agreement with Palm Beach County: “[A]uthorizes the Mayor to execute the Interlocal Agreement between Palm Beach County and the City that sets forth the terms and conditions for the use of $294,477 . . . for increased code enforcement activities within the CDBG Target Area.”


Then resolution 57-2018 followed this item on New Business:


Ordinance No. 2018-16 - First Reading - Amending Chapter 2 “Administration”, Article VII “Abatement of Nuisance”, Section 2-75.11 “Foreclosed, Vacant and Unimproved Property Registration Program” and to require additional requirements for vacant and unimproved property and scheduling the Second Reading and Public Hearing [Oct. 16th].


[FYI: To look over Resolution 57-2018 and Ordinance 2018-16 use this link to the City’s website then look for “September 20 Regular Meeting” to download the agenda and all the backup information. To learn more about the City’s Community Code Compliance Dept. click on this link.]


Basically, what is happening is Code Enforcement will be going after the worst of the worst and then going after the less worst. And they are going to keep on going. This information came from the discussion as Commissioner Hardy wanted more information about what would be happening when ordinance 2018-16 passes on Second Reading.

The City of Lake Worth will be getting CDBG funding, this is Federal money administered by Palm Beach County. Due to this CDBG funding more fully-trained and experienced code enforcement officials will be hitting the streets going after “the worst first” in the CDBG Target Area.

The CDBG Target Area is roughly 7th Ave. North to the Town of Lantana border, west of Dixie Hwy. and east of I-95.

Next Monday is the Post’s Lake Worth Very Very Special Monday Cursory Print Edition (LWVVSMCPE) so it will be interesting to see if there is any mention of the increase in Code Enforcement officials considering how much focus that newspaper has put on this City’s Code Enforcement in the past.

Here are some takeaways from the Commission meeting last week:

  • City Manager Michael Bornstein emphasized the major goal is compliance with City codes and getting more structures on the tax roll.
  • City Attorney Glen Torcivia talked about the high rate of success by the City before the magistrate but expressed some frustration as well not mentioning any cases in particular.
  • William Waters from the Community Sustainability Dept. said that magistrates, “Need to treat the bad guy like a bad guy”.
  • Vice Mayor Andy Amoroso talked about how important the Neighborhood Assoc. Presidents’ Council will be in getting the word out to neighborhoods.
  • The practice of abating fines by 90% will be getting much more scrutiny and expect heavier fines (the limit is $250/day which is State law).
  • Commissioner Herman Robinson said, “The public needs to understand there is a new sheriff in town”.
  • And “Insert salty language here”, quipped Bornstein at one point in the discussion.

Now to the video.


The YouTube video below is an 8½ minute segment of the discussion about Resolution No. 57-2018 and Ordinance No. 2018-16, a portion of the discussion which sums things up quite well:




To watch more of this discussion, what occurred previously to this video segment, click on this link and go to the one hour and 28 minute mark.

And as always, Thank You for visiting today.

Where exactly are places, cities, towns and villages in Palm Beach County? And why it matters.


Ever heard of the Geo Nav mapping tool? Learn more about that tool below which has multiple layers of information. After a few tries, in just moments, tons of information will be available. This mapping tool is extremely helpful in many fields including those in public relations, the press and news media to quickly see the location of an incident and nearby landmarks and whether it’s in a municipality. Or not.

For example, when it comes to news reports about crime and other mayhem CBS12 recently and falsely reported about a stabbing ‘in Lake Worth’. This crime actually happened in either the Village of Palm Springs or unincorporated PBC, also called “suburban Lake Worth” (see Tweet below).

Another example, recently in The Palm Beach Post under the heading “IN FOCUS: LAKE WORTH” is this excerpt (link added):

Winefest 2018: The American German Club at 5111 Lantana Road, will be transformed into wine village on Sept. 8.

One would or could assume, of course, this event is being held in the City of Lake Worth. But it’s not. Not even close (FYI: the actual City of Lake Worth uses two zip codes, 33460 and a very small part of 33461).


The American German Club of the Palm Beaches
is located in suburban Lake Worth, it has
a 33463 zip code.

Click on image to enlarge:

The American German Club is a wonderful facility. If you’ve never been you should check it out some day. However, this club is located west of the Great Walled City of Atlantis and south of Greenacres.


It is very easy to verify and/or clarify if a press or news media story is accurate — or not — when reporting about any location in Palm Beach County

It’s called the Geo Nav mapping tool (link to site below) from the PBC Property Appraiser’s Office.

For example see the map below. Just by clicking on the “County Parks” tab (explained below) the County’s John Prince Park shows up as light green. Use the municipal parks tab and every park within a municipality will appear. Click on the “Municipalities” tab and each municipality shows up a different shade of color.

The areas not shaded? Those are unincorporated areas in Palm Beach County such as suburban Lake Worth where the German American Club is located. John Prince Park (site of recent plane crash) and the PBC Park Airport are both in unincorporated PBC. This County airport is not in the Town of Lantana but some still refer to it as the ‘Lantana Airport’. The nearest municipality is the City of Atlantis just west of Congress Ave.


Click on image below to enlarge.

See the legend in the top left?
Go to the Geo Nav mapping tool and click on
“Layers” tab (far left) and have fun!

The Geo Nav mapping tool will come in helpful for viewers of one TV news station in particular, CBS12 (WPEC):



Now go and check out the Geo Nav mapping tool!

If it’s Saturday, it’s West Palm’s Special Day: One of “Six Special Cities” chosen by editor(s) at the Post.


Every week in The Palm Beach Post, for three years now, the same six (6) Special City’s get featured in the print edition. That’s right. The same 6 Special City’s each and every week. For 3 years. Isn’t three years enough? About time for a change?

Who are the 6 Special City’s? Find out below.


But two Special Cities just got
new beat reporters!


Have you been following the switching out and the new beat reporters at The Palm Beach Post?


Both the Town of Jupiter and the City of Boynton Beach have fresh new talent (see below). And how did the little City of Lake Worth become one of the Special Cities? That happened in late 2015 about the time when the public in suburban Lake Worth and municipalities west would go pick up the day’s paper and say. . .

“Aaaaaaahhhh! Aaaaaaahhhh! Aaaaaaahhhh! GOD!”


All about L-Dub again!

Why are they so Special every week?




It’s true. The “Six Special Cities” in the weekly print edition of the Post has been going on for three years now. For some perspective, that would be around the time the Greenacres Police Dept. merged with PBSO and when the cities of Greenacres and Lake Worth had the same assigned beat reporter.

And why isn’t Delray Beach special? Isn’t it about time reporter Lulu Ramadan gets a Special Day or is Delray just ‘Dull-Ray’ to the editor(s)?

The list of Six Special Cities is below.


The ceremonial process begins each Monday
in The Palm Beach Post.


It all starts on Monday, beginning with the Lake Worth Very Very Special Monday Collector Print Edition (LWVVSMCPE).

Then on Tuesday it continues through the week until Saturday. Note the new beat reporters Morse, Denty, and Todaro (click on links below):

  • Tuesday: Town of Jupiter (reporter Hannah Morse; Bill DiPaolo has retired).
  • Wednesday: Village of Wellington (last year Kristina Webb replaced long-time reporter Matt Morgan).
  • Thursday: City of Boynton Beach (first Red Denty and then Chelsea Todaro replaced Alexandra Seltzer who was promoted to County reporter).
  • Friday: City of Palm Beach Gardens (Sarah Peters).
  • Saturday: City of West Palm Beach (Tony Doris).

“IN YOUR COMMUNITY”

The Six Special Cities:

Post reporter Lulu Ramadan covers the Delray Beach beat, eclipsed by Boynton Beach, Palm Beach Gardens, West Palm Beach, Lake Worth, the Town of Jupiter and Village of Wellington as well.


FYI: If you are interested in learning more about the City of Lake Worth click on this link for the official website and browse around for a bit. And if you wish, you can follow the City on Twitter as well:



And Save The Date!

Big change coming next week and excitement too. Monday is the change in recycling methods, Friday is the first Lake Ave. Block Party and Monday, Oct. 8th is Columbus Day, a City holiday. For more upcoming events click on this link.

Attention residents of the City of Lake Worth. Start your preparations.



The BIG DAY is next Monday, October 1st.

This IS NOT NEW NEWS. The City of Lake Worth first notified the public on May 1st. See that information below.


Below is a press release:

“City of Lake Worth Changes to Two Bin Recycling”.



How did the City of Lake Worth get here? From single stream recycling using one 55-gallon container to double stream using two 18-gallon containers?

Following the press release below is more information from a City Commission meeting last May. Simply put, the change in recycling methods is, “mostly due to the single recycling container being used as a second household trash container.”


In other words, when it comes to recycling the words “commingle”, “commingled”, “commingling” and “commingler” are considered dirty words. Our City needed more un-comminglers and that’s why the City has to change recycling methods.

Did you happen to see a door hanger recently? Did you read it or just throw into the recycling? Chucked it into the trash? Here is what that notice from the City looked like:


“Recycle Right in Lake Worth”

Have any questions? Contact the City of Lake Worth’s Public Services Dept. at 561-533-7344.

And please don’t yell.


For common FAQs and contact information use this link for the Palm Beach County Solid Waste Authority (SWA):


SWA’s commitment to recycling began in 1987. For more than 25 years, the SWA has been leading the way in providing convenient and efficient services that preserve our natural resources.
 

In Spanish. . .

Below is the press release from
the City of Lake Worth:


City press release issued by Ben Kerr, PIO.
561-586-1631
Email: bkerr@lakeworth.org


Lake Worth, Florida — Starting Oct. 1, residents and businesses in the City of Lake Worth will have two recycling bins instead of one, as the City restarts its partnership with the Solid Waste Authority of Palm Beach County.

The new partnership will have a big impact on making recycling in the City of Lake Worth more sustainable. Lake Worth’s single stream recycling partner [Waste Management Inc. of Florida; more information below] had raised the cost of recycling by $90 per ton and regular assessments of single stream recycling showed that over a third of loads were contaminated and unable to be cleanly recycled.


[Please note: This is very significant as is explained later.]


By re-partnering with the SWA, the City of Lake Worth will see economic savings as well as benefit from the SWA’s Recycling Revenue Share Program. Recycling efforts through the SWA go back into the local community as a Revenue Share. Since 2010, local municipalities have shared almost $9.3 million in recycling revenue. Lake Worth will now be a part of this program, and benefit from the sale of recyclables.

The SWA has operated a two-bin recycling system since the late 1980s, keeping paper separated from dirty food and drink containers. This ensures that the paper that is recovered is very clean and has a higher value, while wasting as little as possible.

The City of Lake Worth remains committed to environmentally conscious living. An effective recycling program is an important part of that commitment along with our progressive projects such as our Municipal Solar Energy Field, Low Impact LED lighting, and our continued work with the Southeast National Marine Renewable Energy Center on capturing the energy of the Gulf Stream current.

We look forward to partnering with the Solid Waste Authority of Palm Beach County to provide a more efficient and lower cost recycling program to all residents.

“Gee Wiz, Muriel! We have to start using these two little 18-gallon bins for recycling?”


Yes. Starting October 1st. What will be done with all those green/yellow 55-gallon recycling containers? The City will provide that information at a later date.

Forget about silly things like banning plastic straws! This City has a much bigger problems: like educating the public how to recycle properly and that process, recycling, is about to become much more complicated for many of the public. Everything else is just a distraction.

You see, for too many here in this City, that large 55-g recycling container was used as a second trash can. Trash when thrown into the recycling container is called “contamination”. When the recycling truck becomes contaminated the entire load is considered contaminated; the entire truckload becomes refuse, not recyclables. The truck then delivers the load to a landfill or incinerator instead of a delivery to a recycling facility.

If you took the time to recycle properly all your effort was a waste of time if it ended up in a contaminated truck.

“Whoever voted for this thing will never
get my vote again!”


The vote was unanimous at the City Commission, 4-0, with Commissioner Scott Maxwell absent.

From the agenda item at the Lake Worth City Commission meeting on May 1st:


Interlocal Agreement with Solid Waste Authority of Palm Beach County for Delivery of Municipal Solid Waste & Municipal Revenue Sharing Recycling Program Program.

 
Summary: The Interlocal Agreement authorizes the City to deliver dual stream recycling to the Solid Waste Authority of Palm Beach County (SWA) for compensation.

Background and Justification: On September 16, 2008, the City Commission [Jeff Clemens was mayor of Lake Worth] approved an agreement with Waste Management Inc. of Florida (“WM”), for a single stream recycling program. WM agreed to pay the City $10/ton of recycling delivered by the City to WM.


and in conclusion. . .


The single containers are dumped using an automated side load refuse truck, where the driver can only see the recycling at the top of the container and not any comingled [sic] household garbage underneath.

The City does not receive compensation for contaminated loads.



Thank You for visiting today and hope you found this information helpful.

Friday, September 28, 2018

About last night . . . The City of Lake Worth was center stage.


What a great night in Downtown Lake Worth at the Palm Beach County Cultural Council’s premiere screening of “On The Town In The Palm Beaches” produced by WPBT2, the Public Broadcasting Service in South Florida:


As Florida’s largest public media company we are committed to bringing you quality arts, education & cultural heritage content.


This was the first episode of 3rd Season and the featured municipality was the City of Lake Worth. Actor and writer Frank Licari was the host and producer for this episode along with WPTB2 producer Cindy Hing, a longtime South Florida resident.


Frank Licari, Cindy Hing and Melissa Harmon, Dir. of Production at WPBT2.


The City of Lake Worth’s episode of “On The Town” will air at 8:30 tonight on WPBT2 affiliate WXEL-TV, the regional public television service that serves North Miami Beach to Sebastian in Indian River County.


Without further ado. . .


At 6:15 there was already a long line at the door.
The reception began at 6:30.

Click on all images to enlarge:

The Cultural Council is located at the Robert M. Montgomery, Jr. Building in Downtown Lake Worth.


The gallery at the Cultural Council filled quickly.
Before long it was standing room only.

The food provided was exceptional.

One of the screens for the big event. . .

Looking back . . . The Cultural Council “back in the day”, circa 1971, was The Lake Theater.


The sponsors of Lake Worth’s “On The Town” episode:

“Thank You to Our Sponsors”


Thank You to the producers at WPBT2: Also featured on the Lake Worth episode of “On The Town In The Palm Beaches” was The Cottages of Lake Worth book:

Just recently attendees at the annual conference of the Florida chapter of the American Planning Assoc. toured Downtown Lake Worth and The Cottages.


How much do you know about South Florida PBS?

WPBT2 history: “On August 12, 1955, WPBT2
went on the air without a penny of tax money
having been spent.”

A crowd shot:

Notable notables in attendance: Boynton Beach Mayor Steven Grant, Lake Worth City Manager Michael Bornstein, Lake Worth Vice Mayor Andy Amoroso, Lake Worth Commissioner Herman C. Robinson, and Town of Palm Beach Deputy Town Manager Jay Boodheshwar.


And another notable notable. . .

Jon Faust (right), Chair of Lake Worth’s Neighborhood Assoc. Presidents’ Council next to Vice Mayor Andy Amoroso.


Meet the Director of the PBC Cultural Council:
Mr. David B. Lawrence.

Mr. Lawrence addressing those in attendance.


And lastly, a Tweet from last night. . .




Hope you found this information today informative and as always, Thank You for visiting once again today.

Two historic hotels in two downtowns. The Gulfstream Hotel stands tall. The Pennsylvania Hotel stands tall no longer.


Yes. The news is out. There is some “buzz” going on about the Gulfstream Hotel located on bustling Lake Ave. in Downtown Lake Worth. It’s front page news in this week’s Lake Worth Herald.

Read more about the ‘buzz’ in the blog post that follows this one.

But first, let’s consider another historic hotel. One in West Palm Beach and the “END OF AN ERA” in 1994. How much has West Palm’s downtown improved in the twenty-four years since? The editor(s) at The Palm Beach Post recently wrote about its main thoroughfare, “It’s the busiest downtown street in Palm Beach County’s biggest city, the gateway into West Palm Beach … and it’s a crowded mess.”

Here is an excerpt from a Letter to Editor in The Palm Beach Post dated April 4th, 1994 written by “Wes Blackman”:


“It [the Pennsylvania Hotel] is one of the few remaining structures from the city’s glorious but fading past.


Click on image to enlarge: 

Gulfstream Hotel in the City of Lake Worth, the Pennsylvania Hotel, and the Belleview Biltmore in Belleair: What history teaches us about historic preservation.


Newspaper clipping, front page of Palm Beach
Daily News (aka, The Shiny Sheet), Sunday,
February 19th, 1995:

The process of demolishing the Pennsylvania Hotel began much earlier than 1995. There is a name for that. It’s called “demolition by neglect”.

A regional meeting was held this week in the City of Lake Worth.


City of Lake Worth Vice Mayor Andy Amoroso attended the General Membership meeting of the PBC League of Cities held in the Ballroom at the Lake Worth Casino and Beach Complex.

But meetings like this don’t generate enough clicks or social media ‘kicks’ to get much or any attention in the press or news media.

Especially so when there is a kangaroo on the loose.

How much do you know about the PBC League of Cities (LOC)? More information about the League is at the end of this blog post.


Vice Mayor Amoroso is a board member.

For the 2018–2019 League officers
and board members click on this link:

Andy Amoroso with Vice Mayor Kimberly Glas-Castro from the Town of Lake Park.


Andy Amoroso again. . .

Meet the City of Palm Beach Gardens’
Mayor Maria G. Marino.


This week the only press to show up at the Lake Worth City Commission meeting was editor Mark Easton from The Lake Worth Herald. For the latest edition of the Herald which came out yesterday click on this link.

Last Tuesday evening, of course, the big news in the press and news media was about that kangaroo on the loose. Here is a Tweet sent from the chambers at the Lake Worth City Commission:



Without further ado, about the Palm Beach County League of Cities:


The purpose of the Palm Beach County League of Cities, Inc., is to promote and advance the collective interest of the municipalities of Palm Beach County, Florida; to analyize municipal issues and seek positive results through cooperative efforts; to respect the principles of Home Rule; and to encourage and enhance the quality of life of the citizens of Palm Beach County.

The League consists of all 39 municipalities in Palm Beach County, as well as over 100 Associate members. The Board of Directors, installed each May, is made up of 18 city officials: four executive officers, one representative from each of the League's five districts, six representatives from the largest municipalities, two at-large seats, and the Immediate Past President, if in office. Past Presidents still in office serve ex-officio.

The Board appoints the Executive Director, who is responsible for the daily business operation of the League. The Executive Director serves as chief liaison to the County Commission, School Board, department staff, and the Legislative and Congressional Delegation.

Thursday, September 27, 2018

Premiere TONIGHT: “On The Town in The Palm Beaches” featuring City of Lake Worth.


The City of Lake Worth will be the feature story this evening on the South Florida Public Broadcasting Service (WPBT):


The Premiere Screening.


To register for this event contact the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County. Call 561-471-2901, visit the Council today from 10:00–5:00 at 601 Lake Ave. in Downtown Lake Worth, or send an email to: info@palmbeachculture.com

About the upcoming premiere featuring actor writer producer and host Frank Licari:


South Florida PBS invites you to the complimentary premiere event of On The Town in The Palm Beaches’ newest episode — Lake Worth.

  • Reception at 6:30.
  • Screening at 7:30.
  • Q&A follows with Host Frank Licari and producers.

In the new episode host Frank Licari explores the heart of Lake Worth, a city that’s not just hip, it’s historic too. Frank jumps into the city’s happening arts scene; visits an ocean front restaurant with postcard perfect views and checks out an historic playhouse that just may be haunted.

Join us and discover the beautiful
City of Lake Worth!

Downtown Lake Worth (Lake Avenue and ‘L’ Street c. 1971): The Lake Theater.


FYI: If you haven’t heard, the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County has a new president and CEO: Dave Lawrence. For a recent Q&A with Mr. Lawrence click on this link.

Now to the Lake Theater. . .


Click on image to enlarge:

The Cultural Council building.
How it looked circa 1971.

How the building looked
prior to mural installation:

Photo courtesy of the Jim Stafford collection.


Here’s another image soon after the
building was constructed:


It turns out the architect was Roy Benjamin and almost all he did was movie theaters in Florida and Georgia in late 1930s through the 1950s. Below is one of his designs in Pahokee called the Prince Theater. You can see striking similarities to the structure in downtown Lake Worth.





Florida history: “The Road to Beauty” (1965) — Film sponsored by the Florida Citrus Commission.


Below is a video from the State of Florida Archives. Advertising and promotion of Florida’s citrus industry has, shall we say, evolved over time. Here is an excerpt from the text of the article:


“Health maintenance techniques are demonstrated, including how to walk properly, dance as exercise, nutrition (such as citrus), and sports. The film then moves on to discuss career, marriage, and home life. A wife announces that she is pregnant and the couple promptly drinks some orange juice to celebrate.”


Today. Correction issued by editor(s) at The Palm Beach Post.


And the correction is incorrect. It has a typo.

Further below is that correction with the error. Does this correction need a clarification in tomorrow’s paper?

And further below in this blog post is more information about the upcoming General Election, how the Post endorsements fared in the August Primary, and the biggest question of all: Should newspaper editorial boards just end the practice of giving endorsements?

This is a question posited by a journalist at Gatehouse Media in November 2016. By the way, Gatehouse Media bought The Palm Beach Post and the Shiny Sheet on May 1st of this year. Typically Gatehouse buys a newspaper and sits on it for six months before making any major changes. On November 1st it will be 6 months.

Note this correction today (see below) is not a reporter error. Most often corrections and clarifications are published on page A2 in the Post, below the fold, at the very bottom of the page. According to the Poynter Institute, “A global leader in journalism”, corrections should be prominently displayed for readers of newspapers. Here is today’s correction, an editor error in this news article by Alexandra Seltzer:


Due to an editing error, a story on page A6 of Tuesday’s Palm Beach Post incorrectly listed the dates for early voting. Early voting in Palm Beach County will begin Oct. 22 and run though Nov. 4.


Spot the typo? Try again. It’s in the 2nd sentence. By the way, the incorrect dates published in the print edition last Tuesday were: “[B]etween Oct. 27 and Nov. 3”.

Now let’s change gears. . .

With only forty (40) days until the November 6th General Election. . .


How did The Palm Beach Post editorial board do, their picks in the August 28th Primary?

Hint: Not very good at all when it comes to picking judges. For the list of candidates endorsed in the Post from Florida governor to Port of Palm Beach Group 5 look over the editorial board’s scorecard: Click on this link to see who won and who lost.

Who is next in line to be mayor of Palm Beach County? Districts 2 and 4 will be on the upcoming Nov. 6th General Election ballot. Use this link for more information.

Now to the question: Is it time for the newspaper industry to reconsider political endorsements?


Note the Post endorsed Gwen Graham in the Democrat Primary for governor of Florida but made no endorsement in the Republican Primary for governor. Why just arbitrarily choose which races to get involved in but not others? The Sun Sentinel endorsed Jeff Greene in the Democrat Primary and Adam Putnam in the Republican Primary.

But the bigger question is, beyond endorsements, why even give endorsements in the first place? Why not just publish candidate positions and let the readers decide? And if endorsements are so important in newspapers, why didn’t the Post make an endorsement for president of the United States in Nov. 2016?


Read more about that below.


As newspapers continue to evolve, or as Cox Media Group President Kim Guthrie said, “to navigate these disruptive times”, is it time for newspaper editors to develop better strategies? See more of the quote by Guthrie a little later.

Back in the day many people used to cut out the endorsements on Election Day, march to the polls and vote for the endorsed. An endorsement in the Post used to mean a 10–15% bump, at least. But now it’s questionable whether an endorsement really matters at all.

For example, despite not getting the endorsement in the Post Erica Whitfield was elected by a wide margin in 2014 and the rest is history. Whitfield was recently re-elected, unopposed this year and will serve another four year term.

Question: Should a county or regional “paper of record” make an endorsement for all races in the Primary and General Election, stop making endorsements entirely, or just pick and choose which races to get involved in?

For example, in 2016 The Palm Beach Post made no endorsement for president of the United States (more about that later too) but got involved in County issues (e.g., endorsing passage of the ¢1 sales tax increase), and got involved in local races as well endorsing the re-election of Lake Worth Mayor Pam Triolo and commissioners Andy Amoroso and Scott Maxwell.


November 2016: “OUR VIEWS”

In 2016 the Post made no endorsement for the
Lake Worth Neighborhood Road Bond referendum. 
But after the vote it was a different story.

In March 2018 the Post re-endorsed Mayor Triolo and Commissioner Amoroso. But they didn’t endorse Commissioner Maxwell. He won anyway.


Gatehouse Media took over at the Post and that paper continues to make political endorsements. For example, one of those endorsements was awkwardly headlined,

For Ag Commissioner: Republican Grimsley, Democrat Fried

The ‘Democrat Fried’ is candidate Nicole “Nikki” Fried.

And whilst it is true the Founding Fathers and the First Amendment made sure to protect the press, news media and news reporting — one particular sphere in the Constitution — it is also true for those in the business of news to:

“Encourage the public to voice grievances against the news media.”

From Chapter 4.11: The Society of Professional Journalists’ Code of Ethics.


On the topic of newspaper political endorsements, from journalist John Crouch at Gatehouse Newsroom asking the question in October 2016, “Should newspapers still endorse political candidates?” referring to the race for president of the United States:


In the case of the Dallas Morning News, which has traditionally endorsed Republican candidates, endorsing Clinton meant taking a large subscriber hit, which is perhaps not entirely surprising in conservative Texas. In the case of The Repository in Canton, Ohio, which decided that it would not endorse either candidate, [emphasis added] reader reaction was strong enough to elicit a follow-up editorial from editor Rich Desrosiers.


Why didn’t the Post under a former owner (Cox Media Group) make an endorsement for president of the United States in 2016? No one knows for certain but there was some speculation. And there were those political ads too that shocked a lot of people. . .


Warning: The image below may be disturbing and very unsettling for some viewers. And some words of heed and prudence as well.

“[T]o protest the results of an over-and-done election is about as useful as bringing buckets of water to yesterday’s fire.”

Frank Cerabino, Palm Beach Post staff writer, opinion piece published Nov. 14th, 2016.


One of the full-page ads published in the Post leading up to the elections held on November 8th, 2016.

From full-page ad published on page A5;
click on image to enlarge:

The last of three full-page political ads was published two days before election day: “DRAIN THE WASHINGTON SWAMP!” and “VOTE TRUMP!”


No doubt just a coincidence, about a year after those political ads from the Trump campaign were published the Post and the Palm Beach Daily News (aka, The Shiny Sheet) were both put up for sale.


“As the media business continues to change, we must adapt our business strategy to navigate these disruptive times for the benefit of our entire media portfolio,” Guthrie [Cox Media Group President Kim Guthrie] said.


To recap: The Palm Beach Post did not endorse Mr. Donald J. Trump for president of the United States. The Post did not endorse Secretary of State Hillary Clinton either. In 2016 the editor(s) at the Post made no endorsement for president.

Following the election on November 8th, 2016, it was never explained by the editor(s) why they made no endorsement for president. It could be there is no explanation. Maybe they just forgot. But in such a close election anything could have been the tipping point and to this day the speculation continues how that election turned out the way it did.

One big question is what role did Bernie Sanders have to play in all this? Was it a nod to the Sanders supporters why the editor(s) at the Post did not make an endorsement for president?


So many questions.

The primary results from 2016.

Community meeting tonight in the City of Lake Worth.


The Whispering Palms Neighborhood Assoc. is having their public meeting at the Norman J. Wimbley Gym located at 1515 Wingfield St. Meeting begins at 6:30.

The special guest speaker will be:

Jamie Brown, the City of Lake Worth’s
Dir. of Public Services.



Also on the agenda is an update on the “Saturday Cleanup” last week at New Hope Baptist Church. All meetings of the Neighborhood Assoc. Presidents’ Council (NAPC) are open to the public.

Coming up in October: “Free Shred Event” in Downtown Lake Worth.


“Whether it’s a single stack of papers or boxes of documents, just place them into one of our secure shred bins and they will be safely destroyed by Iron Mountain, one of the industry leaders in information protection.”


For more information go to the UPS Store located at 824 Lake Ave., call 561-508-4713 or send an email to: store6645@theupsstore.com

“Marketing / Advertising / Reputation Mgmt. / Branding / Social Media”


See more visions below from the City of Lake Worth’s all-day “Visioning Work Session” held at City Hall two months ago.

On the topic of branding, marketing, and social media our neighboring municipalities are coming up with some very clever ways to promote themselves. Take for example the City of Greenacres and their photo contest last month. Greenacres announced the winners of the contest on their official Facebook page. Greenacres is on Twitter too.

The City of Lake Worth uses Twitter as well; but this City doesn’t have an official Facebook page.

Here is a vision from last month at the City Commission:


“Where We’re Going . . .
Themes  →  Priorities

Whilst on visions, let’s take another look back to the City’s Visioning Session in July and a “very difficult and public conversation about code enforcement.”

Post-Hurricane Irma last year: Do you recall the increased number of cats roaming Central Palm Beach County?


How many of those cats ended up in shelters?
How many got killed by coyotes?

Message below from Monroe County — which includes the Florida Keys — about when and not when to report a Coyote sighting to the Sheriff. Click on image to enlarge:

Yes. Coyotes are here in South Florida. And they are here to stay. Coyotes hunt cats. And little horses too. And they are fond of chickens as well.


UPDATE: For those of you interested in coyotes and concerned about feral and roaming cats, pet goats and pigs, and other small critters there is news below from The Washington Post you may find very interesting and informative. And as we are well into another Hurricane Season read more below about what happened prior to Hurricane Irma last year in one city in particular: the coastal City of Lake Worth.


How many of those cats were “dropped off ” by those fleeing evacuation zones on ‘The Island’ not knowing when they would be allowed back into their condo, apartment, or home?

From the editor at The Palm Beach Post:

“Communities with TNVR programs tend to develop even bigger cat-dumping problems than before the effort began. . .”


Is it time for the City of Lake Worth, and other cities as well, to take another long look at Trap, Neuter, Vaccinate, and Release (TNVR)?

Has Lake Worth, because of its efforts promoting TNVR, become one of the County’s destinations for “cat-dumping” of unwanted or unhealthy cats? From the City’s website:

Peggy Adams Animal Rescue League is currently offering free surgery for domestic and community cats [emphasis added] in the 33460 zip code.


Read more about this topic below, including news from Palm Beach Post reporter Bill DiPaolo who has since retired. Surprisingly, Mother Nature may have its own answer to the problem of roaming and feral cats: coyotes. Did you know coyotes are established in every state in the United States? Below is an excerpt from this recent article in The Washington Post by journalist Darryl Fears titled, “Here’s why there are so many coyotes and why they are spreading so fast”:


     Stanley D. Gehrt, an Ohio State University professor and wildlife ecologist who runs the Urban Coyote Research Project, which studies coyotes in the Chicago area, said in a recent interview that coyotes “are extremely flexible and adaptable to different kinds of environments … they’re generalists for sure, so generalists tend to do pretty well in cities, but they also benefit once they move into cities.
     “Their primary source of mortality in rural areas is now removed, and that was people. You might wonder: How can that be removed? That’s because you don’t have hunting and trapping occurring in the cities. The cities actually act as a kind of refuge for coyotes once they get established.”

Please continue reading about cats, TNVR, coyotes and news about two little goats called Buttercup and Candy.

This blog post examines several issues, several of which our City has had to deal with for a very long time. For example, several months prior to Hurricane Irma in September 2017 another animal was attracting attention from the press and news media which prompted these questions asked on this blog, “How long before coyotes begin roaming and hunting in our little City of Lake Worth? Or are coyotes already here?”

And why having coyotes in our parks at night
and roaming the City’s alley network is
not such a bad thing after all.

How do coyotes factor into controlling the feral cat population? Can coyotes, as stated below, “help restore biodiversity, enrich parks, and counteract decades of environmental damage”? Do TNVR programs for cats even work to control the population or does it make the problem worse, e.g., the continuing devastation of indigenous bird populations? Cats hunt birds and coyotes hunt cats.


“While TNVR theoretically should cut down feral cat populations, several studies have shown that they rarely do.”
—Editor, Palm Beach Post (see editorial below).


And have you ever heard of the book published and titled, “Coyote Settles the South”? Learn about all these topics and much more later in this blog post.

Without further ado. . .


Warning! Never feed coyotes: These animals have a tremendous fear of humans. When people feed coyotes the animals lose that fear. That is not good for anyone. Especially those with small pets.


Are coyotes roaming the streets and alleys of Lake Worth now? Maybe. But unless one has a motion-activated camera during nighttime you would never know. Coyotes are one of the most stealthy animals around and very careful to avoid the notice of humans. They rest during the day, hunt at night, and coyotes are especially fond of one animal in particular: cats.

Reports began coming in 2015 of coyotes near Greenacres. Is that a bad thing? The reports were of coyotes hunting feral cats which are a big problem in Palm Beach County, especially so in Lake Worth. Another excerpt from the editor at the Post:


“Communities with TNVR programs tend to develop even bigger cat-dumping problems than before the effort began, because people feel emboldened to just release their unwanted animals. And the reality is, animal control programs rarely have the resources to actually trap, sterilize and release the thousands of animals that are out there.”


Last year Post reporter Bill DiPaolo wrote this article titled, “Coyotes blamed for killing two pet goats in Jupiter Farms”; an excerpt:


“Two-year-old Buttercup and 3-month-old Candy, both female Nigerian dwarf goats, were killed between 1 a.m. and 3 a.m. while they were in an outdoor area surrounded by a 4-foot-tall wooden fence. The goats — Buttercup weighed 50 pounds and Candy about half as much — were taken to a nearby veterinarian.
     The vet confirmed the bites on the neck and head were from coyotes, said , a lifelong resident of the rural, unincorporated area west of Florida’s Turnpike.”


In the comment section of DiPaolo’s article
is this comment:

“Give credit where credit due. I credit the Coyotes for eliminating the feral cats from our community. Back in the day, I would see feral cats everywhere, every day. Then the Coyotes showed up and it has been months sense we last saw a feral cat. Hats off to the Coyotes for doing their part in keeping the balance of nature alive and well.


The County has essentially conceded that TNVR is the plan until an idea that actually works comes along. Coyotes may be the answer.

Below is an excerpt from The Palm Beach Post editorial board, “Editorial: Wildlife protection must factor into cat release plans”.


     That [TNVR] sounds like the perfect solution, except that it’s not really. Even well-fed cats retain their hunting instinct, and continue to kill significant numbers of wild birds and animals. One study found an outdoor domestic cat is capable of killing 60 birds and 1,600 small mammals in an 18-month period.
     There are so many species of animals that are vulnerable to predation by house cats: ground foraging brown thrashers, oven birds, palm warblers and water thrushes; tiny tree frogs and green anolis; marsh rabbits and Florida mice.
     While TNVR theoretically should cut down feral cat populations, several studies have shown that they rarely do.


Anyhow, back to the coyote:

Watch this news report from CBS2’s Weijia Jiang
from Long Island City, NY:



This article in Slate raises some interesting points. First, you can hardly call coyotes a nuisance because they have a tremendous fear of humans and are virtually impossible to find. The video above is a rare one of a coyote roaming (hunting?) within a city’s borders. And you could argue that coyotes are good for public health and the environment. Here is an excerpt from the article:


     Gehrt [Stanley Gehrt, head of the Cook County Coyote Project] and his team have just completed a large-scale feral cats study, which found that coyotes are repelling them from natural areas within the city. “That has a positive impact on native fauna,” Gehrt says—cats kill a lot of birds. [emphasis added] Recently, researchers at the Illinois Natural History Survey have also been considering white-tailed deer, which are responsible for a remarkable number of automobile accidents; findings suggest that coyotes are making a dent in their population through fawn predation. Out of 15 fawns collared this season, Gehrt says 11 have already been taken by coyotes.
     All of this would seem to be good news for the New York metropolitan area, which could certainly use a better form of rodent control than dangerous poisons. Even a fraction of the effects seen in Chicago could help restore biodiversity, enrich parks, and counteract decades of environmental damage.


Use this link to learn about the book written
by John Lane in 2016.

“A personal narrative about the arrival and flourishing of the American coyote in the Southeast.”

Image from Wikipedia.

Wednesday, September 26, 2018

PINNED POST: Video of Lake Worth City Commission meeting last night.


A “Pinned Post” is one kept at or near the top of the blog. In this case for the rest of the day (video is below, at end of this blog post).


Note that following this blog post is news about the premiere screening of WPBT’s “On The Town in the Palm Beaches” tomorrow night at the Cultural Council featuring the City of Lake Worth and there is another blog post as well about the exciting Fall/Winter event schedule coming up in this City.

To the City Commission meeting last night. . .


Throughout the day will add more information if necessary. Note that the next regularly scheduled Commission meeting will be held on Oct. 16th.

Last night were the Final Budget hearings, the resolutions which lasted all of seven minutes, followed by a proclamation for Lee Antieau’s 100th birthday, then “Commission Liaison Reports and Comments” (the longest portion of the agenda, about twenty minutes) and then Public Comment at the 46 minute mark. At public comment is the traditional time for a person to announce his or her candidacy for a seat on the City Commission. So the curtain closes once again for the person(s) thinking of running against Commissioner Herman C. Robinson in District 4 until the next Commission meeting in three weeks.

Cathy Turk announced her candidacy four (4) months ago to run against Commissioner Omari Hardy in District 2. So far it’s nothing but hemming and hawing when it comes to anyone up to challenging Commissioner Robinson.

But anyhow. . .

The Consent Agenda passed unanimously last night and shortly thereafter the meeting ended. About forty-five minutes after it started. All conducted in a brisk, orderly and professional manner by all of our elected officials, management and staff.

Watch the video at your pleasure today and recommend watching the entire “Liaison Reports and Comments” section — which begins at the 19:40 mark — which includes the details of Mayor Pam Triolo’s trip to the White House last week.


Without further ado. . .