Friday, April 14, 2017

News from The Great Walled City of Atlantis: On page A6 in The Palm Beach Post today.

This Great Walled City is, “a total area of 1.4 square miles”, and “borders the Lake Worth Drainage (L-14) Canal on the north, Lantana Road to the south, Military Trail to the west and Congress Avenue to the east.”

Notice of Zoning Change” and a “Notice of Comprehensive Development Plan Text Change”:
Use this link for the City of Atlantis’ website.

Below is the City of Atlantis in relation to other cities, a town, and a village here in Central Palm Beach County:

Orientation. Up is north:
Atlantis is the purple-tinted area to the south (bottom of map), located east of the City of Greenacres, west of the City of Lake Worth and the County’s John Prince Park:
The area tinted yellow (top of map, east of Village of Palm Springs) is the small Town of Lake Clarke Shores.

But, of course, the most special city of them all is the little 6-square-mile City of Lake Worth:
The City of Lake Worth, if you didn’t know, has two Zip Codes: 33460 and a small part of 33461. To learn more about the City’s borders in relation to the “Lake Worth Corridor” and unincorporated (or “Suburban Lake Worth”), use this link.

A REMINDER.


Tomorrow in the City of Lake Worth. BIBLIOARTE: “Bridging Art & Literacy”.

“Enjoy music, arts and crafts, Live mural painting, a meet and greet with world renowned artist and illustrator Edel Rodriguez* and much more!”
For more information contact Lauren Bennett, the City’s Special Events Manager: 561-533-7363. Email: Lbennett@lakeworth.org

Here are the details for this exciting event, BIBLIOARTE:
  • When: Tomorrow from 11:00 a.m.–3:00.
  • Where: Lake Worth Art Center, 1121 Lucerne Ave.
  • All ages are welcome!
Located in Central Palm Beach County, Lake Worth is a dynamic, multi-cultural city with an individualistic style. People are drawn to the city by its acceptance of different cultures and lifestyles, historic districts, hip downtown and colorful arts district.

*Edel Rodriguez “is a Cuban born American illustrator/artist and children’s book author. He uses a variety of materials, his work ranges from conceptual to portraiture and landscape.”

Stop by and visit Mr. Schlitz at Artsy Fartsy this weekend and don’t forget: Monday is the LWVVSMCPE again!

By now you know the stories in the online edition on Thursday and Friday are the “IN FOCUS” stories in Monday’s Lake Worth Very Very Special Monday Collector Print Edition (LWVVSMCPE). And still no one knows why our City is so special in the first place. It’s never been explained.

The looming question is how long the LWVVSMCPE will go on before the editors at the Post get the correlation between subscriptions and why ignoring all the other cities in Central Palm Beach County is not such a great idea after all. They’ll look around and say, “Hmmm. Why can’t cities like Greenacres be special every once in a while?”

For that to happen maybe the City of Greenacres needs to lure someone like Mr. Schlitz (see below) out for a tour some day and show him around. Motivate him to open up another location and call it, “Being Artsy Fartsy in Greenacres”. It would be front page news in the ‘B’ section for a month.

On Monday, every single Monday, is “IN FOCUS: LAKE WORTH”:
Meet Mr. Schlitz and Artsy Fartsy Decor & More”. A quite colorful addition to our wonderfully “quirky” little City. Make sure to go and take a seat in “The Big Chair”:

Yours Truly in The Big Chair at Artsy Fartsy Decor and More.

One thing is for certain in Monday’s LWVVSMCPE, if you’re one of those few who don’t know how to save phone numbers in your phone, and you desperately need to reach the Parks Department every single Monday, rest assured, that phone number is published each and every week.

However, if you need the phone number for the Parks Dept. in Greenacres you’re out of luck. You’ll need to use the Internet.
Cities like Delray Beach aren’t special any more, eclipsed by cities like Lake Worth and Boynton Beach. However, the City of Lake Worth has “Artsy Fartsy”. They don’t.

Have a question about recycling pizza boxes accumulated over the weekend? The phone number for recycling is also published in the Post, every Monday.

That’s right — published each and every week in the LWVVSMCPE — every single Monday for people who still don’t know how to store phone numbers into their phone and don’t know what the Internet is.

“To this end, the proposed Ordinance simply acknowledges the State Legislature’s preemption of this area of the law.”

The quote above is explained in the blog post below. Thank You for visiting today.

A quick question and a short answer: Will the new Lake Worth City Commission and elected officials be thrown off focus from their stated goals? Yes. The Commission and City government is going to thrown off focus. It’s only a matter of time.

The big question is how long it will take to get back on focus once again when calm and public confidence is restored. Jeff Perlman talked briefly about this at his talk given in the City last year.

The example given was the Pulse Nightclub shootings. The City reacted very quickly last June to restore calm doing everything and anything they could. And it worked. Everyone including all of the electeds rallied together to show support for the victims and the city of Orlando.

On a local level, within municipal borders, it’s very important for a city’s elected leaders to voice concerns over any issue, especially one of great concern to the community or a neighborhood. But when trying to set a policy, or leading the public to believe one can set policy, is when things can go very wrong. Specifically, what an elected body can control and what they can’t.

And more importantly — that the public along the way is educated about what a city can do, such as what our Lake Worth City Commission can regulate — and what they can’t regulate and do, e.g., overstep the authority of County, the State, and Federal governments.

One of the best examples is the problem with sober homes and the heroin epidemic. Local and County officials can do everything they can but Federal laws, like the ADA, protect the ‘bad players’ in many cases. The good news: that is slowly changing.

If our local officials, elected or otherwise, makes the mistake of overstepping their authority they could very well send the City of Lake Worth into court.

However, this “veering off course” can happen on a much smaller scale, confusing the public and potentially distracting the Commission off the issues and concerns that got them elected and the goals set forward at the beginning, leaving the public to think their elected officials have more power then they actually do.

Many of you will recall this recent example, what happened after smoke was spotted coming from a crematorium, a business on Dixie Hwy. here in the City of Lake Worth. Crematoriums are regulated by the State, not local governments.

Two more examples: Like when former Commissioner Ryan Maier suggested trying to regulate the volume of train horns. Those pitch and volume levels are set by the Federal government. Even the State of Florida cannot regulate the sound levels of train horns. Below is another example of what happened back in 2015.

If you didn’t know any better you would think the 6-square-mile City of Lake Worth took a major step forward in the protection of the honeybee colonies. Nothing of the sort happened. The first reading of Ordinance No. 2015-17, “to regulate, inspect, and permit managed honeybee colonies” is already regulated by state law and there’s nothing anyone in Lake Worth can do to supersede that.

This was city government looking like it was trying to do something, something that the City can’t do anything about at all. However, that doesn’t mean officials can’t look for help from other electeds in the County or State with more power to change things or fix a problem.

But “I’m protecting bees” does play well with certain constituents that can be confused or convinced into believing otherwise that one can do more to regulate an issue. I believe the item below (see image) was brought forward by, once again, then-Commissioner Maier (if that is incorrect please feel free to send me the correct information).

The problem, once again, with taking on any issue of concern for the community is leaving constituents thinking you have some special powers you don’t have. In many ways, the little City of Lake Worth has very little control over what happens within our borders, but when they concentrate and focus on the things they can change, remarkable things can happen. But. . .

Click on image to enlarge:
“To this end, the proposed Ordinance simply acknowledges the State Legislature’s preemption of this area of the law.”

And lastly, how much staff time and taxpayer money was used
to “simply” acknowledge State law?

Just a reminder: Crematoriums are regulated by the Dept. of Health, not local governments.

Please note, to avoid any confusion: Crematoriums are in the City of Lake Worth because, at one point in our City’s history, there was nothing stopping crematoriums to operate a business in Lake Worth.

The zoning has been changed and crematoriums are not longer permissible under our zoning code.

However, crematoriums already in operation at the time were, “grand-fathered in”, meaning they can operate only as long as they continue to pay their tax bill, utility bill, etc., keeping up-to-date with the City in general. If the business fails to comply they will lose their business license.

I hope that helps to clear things up like other issues, e.g., the false claim uttered once again by a resident recently at a City Commission the City of Lake Worth is a “sanctuary city”. It’s not. Never was. Simply and categorically false.

Back to the issue of smoke coming from a crematorium, an article by Post reporter Julius Whigham:

The operators of the facility [Premier Funeral Services and Cremations, Inc.], at North Dixie Highway and Eighth Avenue North, were asked to provide the health department with a report about a malfunction at the crematory. Comments posted on on Facebook said that black smoke could be seen from outside the facility Wednesday afternoon.

and. . .

     “I’ve gone out there and pounded their door down,” he [City resident Michael Flack-Fox] said. “There’s something profoundly wrong when (the crematories) emit that much smoke. … It’s a public safety hazard.”

If you ever see smoke coming from a crematorium there are much better options than calling the press, or going on Facebook to complain, or even contacting your local elected officials and City staff to complain:

Contact the Palm Beach County, Florida, Dept. of Health, or call 561-840-4500.


Why contact the Dept. of Health? Because they regulate crematoriums and are responsible for inspections. Not local governments. The City of Lake Worth cannot regulate crematoriums.

So if you see smoke coming from a crematorium and think it’s a good idea to to go there and pound “their door down”, you might have a PBSO deputy on the way and you’ll have a bigger problem to deal with. Instead, contact the Dept. of Health and complain all you can. And get your neighbors to complain too.

Anyhow, this latest news about crematoriums stands in “thick black” contrast to this article by another Post reporter two years ago:

“The thick black smoke was hard to miss. It curled into the sky, swallowing the tops of palm trees and tumbling down like a shroud over the downtown streets around Lake Avenue just west of U.S. 1.”


In 2015, you see, the “thick” smoke “curled” skyward, “swallowing” our trees, and tumbled down our City streets “like a shroud”.

Heavy sigh.

Thursday, April 13, 2017

So. Is the City of Greenacres, “a lot of nothing” as it was described and ranked in The Palm Beach Post last year?

Actually, the City of Greenacres is A LOT “of everything”, according to a recent article in the Post (see below). The issue now is whether or not this news will ever make it into the print edition like the little City of Lake Worth and the weekly news features about our City, the LWVVSMCPE editions. Stay tuned. If this news does make it into print will let everyone know.

Below are two excerpts from this article that appears on the Post online edition (which most readers eschew for the actual print edition):

GREENACRES — The city at Monday’s City Council meeting [April 17th at 7:00] is scheduled to honor the 2016 President’s Volunteer Service Award winners.
     The awards recognizes citizens of all ages who have made a significant committment [sic] to volunteer service. In 2005, Greenacres was approved as an official certifying organization for the awards.

and. . .

     At Monday’s meeting, Mayor Joel Flores and the city council will honor 22 volunteers who totalled 6,153 hours, the city said.

By the way, Mayor Joel Flores recently defeated the incumbent in the elections last March and Paula Bousquet is now the Deputy Mayor in Greenacres. Neither of them was endorsed by The Palm Beach Post editorial board.

On the subject of “a lot of nothing”, if you recall, last year Frank Cerabino at the Post wrote the City of Greenacres is “a little bit of everything and a lot of nothing.” Take a few minutes and check out their new website. Awesome!

And Cerabino wrote Greenacres had a “dollop of Hispanic”?
The City of Greenacres had “an extra dollop of Hispanic” last year? Oooops. The new mayor of Greenacres is Joel Flores.

Anyhow. Below are more not-so-flattering observations from ‘The Satirist last year if you happen to live in these cities and towns:
  • Belle Glade: “For the overwhelming majority of local residents who aren’t talented and driven enough to make it to the NFL”
  • Haverhill: “goes out of its way to put out the unwelcome mat.”
  • Highland Beach: “another coastal sliver of a municipality that goes out of its way to put out the unwelcome mat.”
  • Mangonia Park: “marked by the biggest, ugliest eyesore in the county”
  • Atlantis: “there are times you must venture beyond the feudal walls.” Good point.
  • Boynton Beach: “perpetually overshadowed and trying to catch up.”
Will all the cities in Palm Beach County (now 39 total) ever be given the opportunity to rank The Palm Beach Post some day? Just wondering.

More and more restaurant and food reviews in the little City of Lake Worth: “C′est si bon, Mademoiselle, Monsieur en charmant LéDûb!”


UPDATE! Possibly due to the “Five Tips” (see below) the food and restaurant reviews here in the City of Lake Worth (or “LDub” if you prefer), are lining up fast like bowls of kimchi, bibimbap, tacos, and chilled dishes of crème de la crème! 

Please Note. A timely reminder, Dear Readers: 

LDub, L-Dub, or the preferred usage in French Canadian, parts of the EU, United Nations, etc., “LéDûb”, is patois (informal speech) for the U.S. City of Lake Worth in the State of Florida, Palm Beach County. The ‘L’ is short for “Lake” and ‘Dub’ is short for “double-‘u’ ” as in the letter “W”, for Worth, hence the term LDub or LéDûb, a charming reference to that exceedingly interesting City.

Used in a sentence: “Welcome to LéDûb, Monsieur Kerr, s´il vous plaît for keeping everyone so informed about our little City by the Sea! C′est si bon!”


Now back on the topic: Just some of the latest food and restaurant reviews in the City of Lake Worth, “en LéDûb”, are by Jeff Ostrowski (again!), reporter Corvaya Jeffries, and Staff Writer Julio Poletti, et al!

Check back in a day or two and will have excerpts from all these reviews. And remember: if you like the review or have some feedback, make sure to contact the reporter and let them know. In the meantime, below is another recent review by Ostrowski and make sure to learn about the “Five Tips” below from the Post business editor, Antonio Fins.

Without further ado. . .

“C′est si bon” in French means, “It is so good”. Ever been to The French House Café in Downtown Lake Worth? If you haven’t been the croque monsieur is spectacular. Below is an excerpt from the review of this Downtown restaurant by business reporter Jeff Ostrowski, an excerpt:

“This breakfast-and-lunch spot serves such standard fare as crepes, baguette sandwiches, salads and cheese plates. The most expensive item on the lunch menu is $16.50, and most sandwiches and salads cost less than $14. Beer and wine are available.”

IF YOU GO:
The French House
821 Lake Ave. (corner of Lake Ave and Dixie Hwy.), 561-345-2559.
Hours: Tuesday to Friday, 10 a.m.–2:30 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday, 9:30 a.m.–2:30 p.m. Closed Monday.

The business editor at the Post has a list of creative ways to get attention for your restaurant and/or business. Click on this link to study the “5 Tips, here are two of them:

Know whom you want to reach out to, the editor writes, “. . . the trick is reaching to the right journalist.” For example, trying to get the attention of a local beat reporter may not be the best option, and. . . “So if your business has ‘good visuals,’ drop in a link to some B-roll video that we can attach to the story.”

Get cracking and don’t give up. Some day maybe even a Post reporter such as Alexa Silverman or even Eddie Ritz will come walking into your “LéDûb” restaurant or Hipster venue and change everything!

TODAY: Tree Board meeting at 5:30, City Hall conference room (held every 2nd Thursday of the month).

Please take note: The “Fruit tree give-away at Grey Mockingbird Lake Worth Earth Day Festival” is an important topic of discussion at this Tree Board meeting (see agenda below).

Click on image to enlarge:
Use this link for more information about the 2017 Lake Worth Earth Day Festival on April 22nd held at The Scottish Rite. Please note the kind sponsors above.

The staff liaison for the City of Lake Worth’s Tree Board is Mr. Dave McGrew from the Parks Department and you can contact him for additional information at 561-586-1677 or by email: dmcgrew@lakeworth.org

To learn how to become a volunteer for the Tree Board, what the board does and its stated mission, and learn about all the excitement at the Tree Board meeting last February use this link. Here is the agenda for tomorrow’s meeting:

City Tree Board,* Thursday, April 13th, 5:30
City Hall Conference Room, 7 North Dixie Hwy.
  • Call to Order.
  • Pledge of Allegiance.
  • Agenda additions, deletions, reordering.
  • Approval of minutes.
  • Public participation of non-agenda items.
  • New Business [take note of time limits for discussion]. 1) Advisors report, 5 minute limit. 2) Fruit tree give-away at Grey Mockingbird Lake Worth Earth Day Festival, 5 minute limit. 3) 17th Avenue North Natural Area exotic pest plant removal April 29, 2017, 5 minute limit.
  • Old Business: Landscape Ordinance review and recommendations (2 hour limit).
  • Adjournment.
*NOTE: If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the board a record of the proceedings is required per F.S. 286.0105.
     One or more members of any board may attend and speak at the Tree Board meeting.

Today. Closing of exhibit. Yury Darashkevich — “Reflections” — an exhibition of works.

To learn more about the artist, use this link. The details:
  • Where: At LULA’s Annex, 1121 Lucerne Ave., in the little New City of Lake Worth.
  • To contact LULA Lake Worth Arts use this link for more information or call Emily Theodossakos at 561-493-2550.
  • Closing reception today (April 13th) from 6:30–8:30.
Are you an artist or know an artist who may want to join a neighborhood renaissance “in the heart of Lake Worth, Florida”, just a short ride to the Beach all year long on a bike or scooter?

If so click on this link. Let them know about a creative community and “get rid of the auto and walk Downtown for groceries, Tri-Rail is just ½ mile away, and ride your bike to the Beach!”

Wednesday, April 12, 2017

While I was searching for something else yesterday. . .

Just happened to see a news release titled, “Recognition of Service to Barbara Katz. Land Development Regulation Advisory Board (LDRAB) Member”:

The Land Development Regulation Advisory Board recognized Barbara Katz for her 12 years of service to LDRAB at the March 29, 2017 meeting.

Click on image to enlarge:

Tuesday, April 11, 2017

Wow. That was quick. About the City Commission Work Session this evening.

The Work Session tonight begins at 6:00; use this link to download the agenda and give it a look.

Just a few days ago penned the blog post below titled,
“Better sooner than later: A complete re-organization of the way volunteer boards are created, managed, and staffed”.
This was a lively matter of debate at the last City Commission meeting on April 4th.

Along with the topic of how to better organize and manage our volunteer City boards here in Lake Worth the other two items will be a Code Enforcement update and business licenses going forward. To watch this meeting Live Streaming use this link for the opening page of the City’s website.

Without further ado, the blog past from April 8th on the topic of our volunteer boards:

If you’re “Interested in serving?” or just want to look over all the volunteer advisory boards in the little City of Lake Worth use this link.

For a number of reasons, the topic of our volunteer boards is a hot-button one now and there’s a call from some of our Electeds and the public to have a workshop to see how to better manage this very important function. Remember, each of our boards require City staff time, resources, and taxpayer money.

However, it’s also important to remember without our volunteers serving on boards, giving of their time and energy, the City would not be able to function.

Basically the issues are:
  • How many boards does the City need with such a small population of residents?
  • What issues should a board handle?
  • Should some boards be eliminated and others consolidated?
  • Should the qualifications, e.g., a résumé, be required to serve on a specific board for which technical experience would bring a big benefit to the City?
  • And how best to eliminate the possibility the public would see this process as politically motivated?
Am not sure how current this information is, but take the “Recreation Advisory Board” for example:

“The Board assists in promoting awareness and involvement in City’s recreation programs. The Board also serves as advisors in policy, programming, finances, future land acquisition, and facility capital projects relating to recreational needs of the citizens. Members: Three year terms.”

OK. The City of Lake Worth already has a Planning and Zoning Board, it’s the job of the City Commission to set policy and they get plenty of advice already, the City has a “Finance Advisory Board, and the big question is. . .

Why doesn’t this board just focus on the present recreational needs of the public in Lake Worth?

Also, there are only 3 members on this 7-member Recreation Board. They can’t have a quorum anyhow. Then why not just eliminate the board and give these volunteers the opportunity to serve on another board of their choosing?

One last thing. Every City board needs to be and stay focused on what they can do and just as importantly, what they can’t do. Not making the process and responsibilities very clear will just create more confusion for the public, something the New City of Lake Worth deserves from our New City Commmission.

And, by the way, almost a month into it, there still is no official photograph of the “New City Commission” or of commissioners Omari Jamal-Hatchett Hardy or Herman C. Robinson. Hopefully soon all of our electeds will have updated photos of the “Mayor & Commissioners”.

McMow Art Glass Helping to Bridge the Gap Between Art & Literacy.

“McMow Art Glass to kick off BiblioArte Week in Lake Worth alongside the Little Free Library Project and famous artist Edel Rodriguez.”

The kickoff event to unveil the McMow Glass Art Little Free Library and the BiblioArte Bridging Art & Literacy event is on Saturday, April 15th from 11:00 am–3:00 pm at the Lake Worth Art Center, 1121 Lucerne Ave. in the City of Lake Worth.

More about this event below from Taylor Materio, following the YouTube video (see below).

About McMow Art Glass: Since opening in 1976, McMow Art Glass has provided Palm Beach County with the highest quality stained glass windows, beveled art glass, and intricate glass designs. McMow’s range of offerings includes residential, commercial, and worship glass design, as well as providing restoration and etching services.

Located at 701 N. Dixie Highway in Lake Worth, McMow also hosts regular art glass classes and showcases rotating collections of retail pieces in the store. For more information call 561-585-9011.

Meet one of our iconic Dixie Hwy. business owners, Shanon Materio:



“We are honored to help kick off this important week that will celebrate and promote art and literacy throughout our community,” said Taylor Materio. “There is a strong link between art and literacy, children identify words through imagery in picture books long before they learn how to read. Helping students of all ages fall in love with literature through art is a wonderful idea and something we are proud to be a part of.”

“A Riddle”. A Poem. Written by poet unknown. Guest at Gulfstream Hotel. Lake Worth, Florida. 1963.


           “ A lake ~ and swinging palm trees,

                                                                     The Ocean ~ deep and green ~ ”


[Click on image to enlarge. . .]
Remember 2015 Coastal Observer series about the history of the Gulfstream Hotel? The first issue was titled, “Dog Days and Glory Days”. From that series, a poem. . .

. . . can you guess My riddle?*

Some folks, they like a riddle,
Now here is one for you.
It’s square, not deep, but open
Soft breezes blowing through.

Beyond the sky is lovely,
While clouds go sailing o’er.
I hear the call of song birds,
A distant train’s low roar.

A lake ~ and swinging palm trees,
The Ocean ~ deep and green ~
Now can you guess My riddle?
It’s my window ~ at Gulf Stream


*Poem about the Gulfstream Hotel from December, 1963 titled, “A Riddle”, written anonymously by a visitor to the hotel 54 years ago. Poem reprinted in the Coastal/Greenacres Observer (publisher: Lake Worth Herald) on October 29th, 2015.

Curb Cuts: One of the great social victories in modern American history

The National Museum of American History (Smithsonian) has this article titled, “Smashing barriers to access: Disability activism and curb cuts”. Curb cuts are everywhere now and taken for granted. After World War II though they were still very rare in the country. Curbs were typically 6″ high and very difficult for those in wheelchairs and other mobility issues to go up and down.

The high number of handicapped veterans returning from WWII demanded change. Here is an excerpt from Julie Peterson's article:

Today, this seems like an odd thing to rejoice about, since curb cuts are now so commonplace in cities throughout the U.S. However, sidewalks and public spaces in the built environment were not always so accessible to people with disabilities. The development of curb cuts and the concept of accessible public spaces has been long in the making and has only become possible through the hard work of activists like Mr. Fisher [Jack Fisher of Kalamazoo, Michigan], the passage of federal legislation on accessibility requirements, and developments in design.
     Wheelchair-using individuals have navigated obstacles in the built environment since the first wheelchairs. In the 1940s and 1950s, a large contingency of veterans returned from World War II with mobility-related injuries. Many of these individuals pushed for changes to the built environment to make college campuses and public spaces more accessible to wheelchair users and other disabled people.
This image is from the article by Julie Peterson in the Smithsonian.

Monday, April 10, 2017

Do you live in a coastal community in Palm Beach County and don’t think Senate Bill 10 is a big deal?


Think again.

From page D6 in the print edition of The Palm Beach Post today:
Mr. Keith Wedgeworth writes (emphasis added):

“At the end of the day, the latest version of SB10 is nothing more than a bill pushed by environmental special interests with one sole purpose — taking valuable farm land out of production, which is why the Central Palm Beach County Chambers Board of Directors put together a resolution opposing the bill.
     Slogans and bumper sticker solutions are great fundraising tools, but do a disservice to the resource. Arbitrarily saying another EAA reservoir will fix problems is harmful to the coastal communities and to our farming community.”

And remember, Lake Worth, how many more bond issues will we need to fix our infrastructure if $2–4B (‘B’ as in “billion”) is used to build a reservoir in Palm Beach County to test a theory that may or may not even work we’ll just have to wait and see — that’s considered environmental science in the 21st Century here in Florida?

If you haven’t contacted your elected officials yet, well, now is the time.

Remember that “SPECIAL!” insert in Sunday’s Palm Beach Post about our little 6-square-mile City! “Hmmm. Pardon me, Sir. Where is West Palm?”


Well. Guess what. There was another special section in the paper that day you probably missed about our City’s athletes. Learn more about that below.
Featured on the back cover: Meet the iconic Mr. Greg Rice during Our Centennial Year in 2013.

Remember that 12-page “SPECIAL KEEPSAKE SERIES” delivered on Sunday, March 26th, in The Palm Beach Post? Do you still have it? I DO!!!

However, there was more special news that day about the little City of Lake Worth you may have thrown into the recycle bin and didn’t realize what you missed.

Along with that Sunday print edition there was a non-too-turtle-friendly plastic bag which included coupons, advertisements from big-box retailers and pharmacies, the weekly 24-page TV Post in 7- or 8-point type no one can read without a magnifying glass, and there was something else in that voluminously-stuffed plastic bag as well:

The “All-Area Teams” Post insert, Section 5 titled, “Special Pullout Bonus”, 6 pages in all:

“HONORING THE BEST LOCAL ATHLETES FOR THE 2017 WINTER SEASON”

So, if you never bother with the coupons and know how to use a cable remote for the TV schedule and just threw that plastic bag away, you missed the names of these Lake Worth athletes in the following sports:

Boys Basketball
  • Joshua Rathell, Senior, Guard
  • Marques Spann, Junior, Guard
  • Honorable Mention: Jadon Randell
Girls Basketball
  • Klara Felder, Senior, Guard
  • Honorable Mention: Markadala Theophile
Girls Weightlifting
  • Stephanie Etlenvil, Senior
  • Hoxley Richet, Senior
  • Honorable Mention: Amber Hamm
No Lake Worth athletes were mentioned in these sports:
  • Boys Soccer
  • Girls Soccer
  • Boys Wrestling/Weightlifting
Would that be because facilities are not available, not in good enough condition to be used, or the funds not available from the Palm Beach County School District for supplies and equipment? Draw your own conclusions.

Congratulations to all our City of Lake Worth Athletes!

The Art League here in the City. More news from the Herald, an excerpt:

“Now celebrating 75 years in the community, the Lake Worth Art League located at 604 Lucerne Ave. continues to offer classes and is revving up for their celebration for April 22–23 with a major showing of artists on the Cultural Plaza.
     Meanwhile they have a call for art to be placed around Lake Worth establishments. Call 561- 586-8666.
     One of the newest classes being offered is Drawing On The Right Side of the Brain with Vee Corallo. This class is held on Saturdays from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. for eight weeks. Members $100, Non-members $125.
     The premise of this New York Times best seller is ‘if you can read well, you can draw well.’ You do not have to be an artist! This class is for everyone and research shows it’s extremely helpful to those that have suffered a stroke and for those who say ‘I can’t draw.’ ”

Use this link to subscribe or get more information about The Lake Worth Herald. Pick up the print edition at 600 Lake Ave., the City’s Downtown newsstand, a nice man named Andy will assist you. The newspaper still costs only ¢50.

Learn more about Lake Worth’s very own “Artsy Fartsy Décor and More” and Mr. Brian Schlitz.

Below is a recent interview with Mr. Schlitz in the Lake Worth CRA’s newsletter Up Front, the article is titled, “Business Highlight: Artsy Fartsy Décor & More”.

Meet Mr. Brian Schlitz.
Guess what the featured news was on Monday, January 2nd, in the Post’s Lake Worth Very Very Special Monday Collector Print Edition (LWVVSMCPE)? That’s right! Mr. Schlitz and Artsy Fartsy Décor and More.

To read the entire CRA newsletter use this link for news about:
  • New construction on Dixie Hwy.
  • Happenings in the Tropical Ridge and Royal Poinciana neighborhoods.
  • Grand opening of the Arts Studio Cafe.
  • More photos from the City’s Street Painting Festival last February.
  • Upcoming exhibits and events and more.
Here are excerpts from the interview with Mr. Schlitz:

Tell us about yourself?
I was born and raised in Staten Island, New York. I came from a large family; my brothers, sister and I longed for a warmer climate and Florida was the answer. After originally making Boca Raton home, I stumbled upon this one of a kind, close knit and charming town of Lake Worth.
What made you choose Lake Worth?
Lake Worth is a very artsy, charming town and the perfect place for a specialized, fun décor store. The locals and tourists, alike, love our pieces and feel right at home.
What do you like best about having your business within the City of Lake Worth?
Lake Worth’s top business assets are the public officials in place, the downtown (two downtown streets running east/west which allows for double the amount of walkability and opportunity), the beach casino and the artistic, quaint and close knit feel that makes Lake Worth so unique.

Thank You for choosing our little City of Lake Worth!

A shout-out to Post reporter Corvaya Jeffries, “Got the late-night munchies” in the Lake Worth area?

The Post reporter Corvaya Jeffries cites in her article Tacos Al Carbon as one of the top best-of-the-best late-night eateries in the “West Palm, Lake Worth Area”.

If you didn’t know, this restaurant featuring “Authentic Mexican Food” will soon be opening a 24-hour location at 2200 North Dixie Hwy. (corner of Fordham and Dixie) in the College Park area of Lake Worth — the actual City of Lake Worth that is — not another Tacos Al Carbon location with a ‘Lake Worth’ address out west of the City.

This new and exciting food venue is right next door to Mama Gizzi’s Gourmet Pasta and a short walk to The Sugar Monkey too! 

This helpful item is in today’s TGIF section in the Post:
Found this information helpful? Would you like the reporter to stop by and check our your Lake Worth restaurant or Hipster hangout some day soon?

Then send an email to: cjeffries@pbpost.com

Wes keeps on “beating a dead horse”: Those one-way streets in our City. Try an experiment: Return a few back to two-way traffic?


First, whilst on the subject of “beating a dead horse”. . .

Does our City need or does the public even want a pool at the Beach any longer? Or is it time to take a fresh look and consider other options? Remember, the reason historically to have a Casino with a pool was to serve tourists and visitors on A1A and Dixie Hwy. when those were the major roadways through our region prior to the construction of I-95. And don’t forget — for a family of 4 in Lake Worth on a tight budget, a few hours at the pool started off at $16 with parking — a cost too high for many.

This is going to become a very big topic of debate in the coming months. So. If it’s decided to construct a new community pool where should it be in our City? At the Beach or somewhere else? Use this link for my thoughts on this topic.


Whap Whap Whap Whaf WHAP!
The image above is from The Inimitable Tom McGow, a former Lake Worth resident and blogger-extraordinaire who called the pool at the Beach a White Elephant” back in 2010.

Now back to “Those one-way streets. . .”


The City’s bond referendum passed overwhelmingly last November to fix the roads and potholes, can we try a little experiment? Try changing a few one-way streets back to two-way like our City was designed in the first place over 100 years ago? Two-way streets it’s thought creates more “eyes on the street”, reduces crime, increases property values, and slows down speeding cars. Just a few benefits.

Here’s an article from the Strong Towns blog written by Rachel Quednau; an excerpt:

     A recent article out of South Bend, IN suggests that the movement toward two-way streets is growing. [emphasis added] South Bend plans to convert many of its downtown streets back into two-ways by the end of 2016.
     As an example from the neighboring state of Kentucky, the article explains how one multilane couplet (two parallel one-way streets that move traffic in opposite directions) was previously a high crime, low-property value area:
     John Gilderbloom, director of the Center for Sustainable Urban Neighborhoods at the University of Louisville, lived on First Street with his wife when he first moved to the city. 
It was awful, he recalled recently. “There were prostitutes, people selling fenced goods, drugs, everything like that. . .” But after the couplet was returned to its two-way origins:
     Steadily, crime fell, property values rose and retail revenues increased, he said. New investment followed, as residents and business owners rushed to take advantage of the improving landscape.
Remember, Lake and Lucerne avenues in the Downtown weren’t always a multilane couplet (one-way each way). That came later when the most important goal for FDOT and traffic engineers was getting cars from point A to point B as quickly as possible, pedestrians and bicyclists an afterthought.

Many streets in Lake Worth could easily be returned to two-way without many changes to the road infrastructure. Of course things like signage will have to change along with driver behavior as well.

Good idea? Or is Wes still “beating a dead horse”?
Important to remember: Lake and Lucerne avenues are controlled by FDOT, not the City. Other FDOT roadways in the City are Lake Worth Rd., Federal Hwy., and of course I-95.

Sunday, April 9, 2017

Commentary and opinion IS NOT NEWS and should be clearly labeled either “Commentary” or “Opinion” in the print edition of a newspaper.

Ironically, in tomorrow’s Palm Beach Post, in the LWVVSMCPE (explained below) will likely be a “Commentary” by beat reporter Kevin Thompson lamenting a “shameless exploitation at its highest” by bringing even more attention to this “shameless” issue.

Oh, well.

In a previous “Commentary” published in the LWVVSMCPE last February, the headline editor at the Post DID NOT clearly identify opinions about the Lake Worth municipal pool as either “Commentary” or “Opinion”. That is essential for newspaper readers to unambiguously understand (more about that below). The last line in the opinion piece about the City’s pool was this:
“And the city has been drowning in it far too long.”
The quote above is not “news” — although it may be accurate for some “the city has been drowning in it” — that is clearly opinion. Opinion and commentary belongs on the editorial page. That’s what the editorial page is for.

Whether the headline editor labels this matter correctly or not is up to the Post. Here on this blog, however, the “shameless exploitation” cited above was never a topic on this blog about the City of Lake Worth.

Anyhow, tomorrow is Lake Worth’s Very Very Special Monday Collector Print Edition (LWVVSMCPE). Again. Each and every Monday.
The cities of Greenacres, Palm Springs, Atlantis, and Lake Clarke Shores are not special. Those citizens should understand the LWVVSMCPE was not Lake Worth’s idea. The editors at the Post made that decision . . . sans public debate and participation.

For more about “Commentary” and “Opinion” from The New York Times Clear Thinking, Clear Writing” is this:

“Distinguish between advocacy and news reporting. Analysis and commentary should be labeled. . .”.

And if you think some in the City of Lake Worth are too critical of The Palm Beach Post:


“Encourage the public to voice grievances against the news media.

It’s important to remember most subscribers of the Post get the print edition and eschew the online version. Note the online version about the “shameless exploitation at its highest” is clearly labeled “Commentary”. And there’s no reason that print subscribers shouldn’t be clearly advised as well if this appears in the ‘B’, Local Section tomorrow.

Beginning next Tuesday: “Public Hearing Notice: Notice is herely given. . .”

Click on image to enlarge:
Image from the Palm Beach County Property Appraisers Office. The information below was publicly noticed in The Lake Worth Herald.

Notice is hereby given that public hearings will be held on:
  • Tuesday, April 11, 2017 at 6:30 p.m. by Land Development Board
  • Thursday, May 11, 2017 at 6:30 p.m. by Local Planning Agency
  • Thursday, May 11, 2017 at 6:30 p.m. by the Village Council, after LPA
  • Thursday, June 8, 2017 at 6:30 p.m. by the Village Council
In the Village Hall Council Chambers at 226 Cypress Lane, Palm Springs to consider:

Small-Scale Land Use Amendment, Rezoning, and Mixed-Use Site Plan

An application submitted by Kevin McGinley, agent for Congress Oaks Development Group LLC (“Applicant”), for Small-Scale Land Use Amendment of the Future Land Use Map to change the land use from Commercial to mixed-use, concurrent with Rezoning from Commercial General (CG) to Mixed Use (MU) and a mixed use Site Plan (SPR17-04), for construction of a mixed use development consisting of a 47,530 square feet Congregate Living Facility (CLF) with 61 beds and 4,760 square feet of associated commercial business designed to serve the residents of the CLF and the general public located at 1212 South congress [sic] Avenue.

and. . .

All persons interested in these matters may appear at the times and place aforesaid and be heard. Prior to the meeting the application may be reviewed at the Village Clerk’s Office.