Sunday, March 26, 2017

First Annual Historic Preservation Awards: Nominations open. Due by April 3rd.

Below is the press release from Ben Kerr, the City of Lake Worth’s Communications Specialist. For further information or media inquiries contact Mr. Kerr at 561-586-1631; email: bkerr@lakeworth.org

Lake Worth, FL* – Historic Preservation Awards Program (nominations due by April 3rd)

The City of Lake Worth division of Planning, Zoning and Historic Preservation opened nominations for the first annual Lake Worth Historic Preservation Awards. Awards will be given in five categories:
  • Rehabilitation/restoration
  • Compatible new construction or addition
  • Preservation of historic materials
  • Preservation craftsman
  • Preservation champion or organization
Members of the Historic Resources Preservation Board will judge each entry on its merit. An awards ceremony will take place at the Lake Worth Casino Ballroom during National Historic Preservation Month, Wednesday, May 17th.

“The preservation of our historic resources ensures the retention of our own unique character and identity as well as adds value to our community. We hope that this program will foster a greater understanding of the positive preservation efforts in our community, and the beneficial impact these projects have on our neighborhoods and the City as a whole.”
—Aimee Sunny, City of Lake Worth Senior Preservation Coordinator.

*Located in central Palm Beach County, Lake Worth is a dynamic, multi-cultural city with an individualistic style. People are drawn to the City by its acceptance of different cultures and lifestyles, historic districts, hip downtown and colorful arts district.

1 comment:

Anonymous said...

Having just replaced the roof on my historic home I have a particular pet peeve. If the City forces property owners to use a more expensive material (ie. roofing material that costs $20,000 instead of $8,000) they really should not get to twist the knife and charge more for permitting b/c of the more expensive materials they are forcing the home owner to use.

Said another way, any mandated materials due to historic preservation should not be part of the total construction cost that the permit is calculated on.