Saturday, September 28, 2019

Pier at the beach in Lake Worth Beach is named in honor of William O. Lockhart, a former commissioner.


William Osborne Lockhart was the former pier master who passed away in 2003: “[I]t was the city’s pier that Lockhart spent many years of his life.”


The news below is from July 2003 by long-time South Florida editor and reporter Kari Barnett.

Click on image to enlarge:

Newspaper clipping from the Lake Worth Forum dated July 8th, 2003. The Forum is published by the Sun Sentinel for distribution in Palm Beach County.

The caption beneath the photo reads in part:


The pier at Lake Worth Beach, first opened in 1954, was recently renamed by the city commission for long-time activist William O. Lockhart, who died in April at age 71.

Article continues on p. 6 . . . three excerpts:


“William Lockhart was a friend of society and a proud member of this city,” said Paul Martin, who was overcome with emotion at the unanimous vote [July 1st, 2008 at City Commission] to change the name.
     Martin, along with others in Lake Worth, started a grassroots campaign months ago to raise funds to pay for the lettering on a new sign showing that the pier is named in Lockhart’s honor.

and. . .


     Along with his charitable efforts, Lockhart was a city commissioner in the late 1980s who attended many meetings around the city’s neighborhoods.
     After retiring from his city job in 1991, Lockhart was a volunteer with the Lake Worth Citizens on Patrol and was president of Lake Worth Citizens on Task.
     But it was the city’s pier that Lockhart spent many years of his life.

and the article concludes. . .


     Commissioner Nadine Burns took time at the end of last week’s commission meeting to recall what she thought Lockhart meant to the City of Lake Worth.
     “I was cleaning out one of the file cabinets here at city hall and I realized William Lockhart was one of the most repeated names,” Burns said.
     “We did a good thing tonight.”


The William O. Lockhart Pier was one of the sites visited by writer Lori Durante* of the Museum of Lifestyle & Fashion History in a blog post dated Oct. 2012 titled, “Black Bahamian descendants from Miami tour historic Lake Worth”. According to Durante former Palm Beach Post reporter Willie Howard provided research on Lockhart’s ancestry.

Another stop on the tour was the St. John’s Episcopal Church in the City of Lake Worth: “Lake Osborne Addition was once Lake Osborne ‘Colored’ Addition that was settled around 1917 by black Bahamians.” Durante then states that in 1999 the City deleted the derogatory term ‘Colored’ from City plat maps.

Durante’s tour also visited the Grant AME Chapel, “[E]stablished in 1922 and is the oldest black church in Lake Worth. The church organization originated in the neighboring Town of Lantana.”

More history about the William O. Lockhart Pier: the hurricanes of 2004–2005.


After the pier was renamed in 2003 and according to reporter Kari Barnett some thought the name change would be “confusing for some visitors” and others wanted the name to remain the “Lake Worth Pier” a much bigger issue came along in September 2004. What no one could have predicted and very few were prepared for: hurricanes Frances and Jeanne and then Wilma visited the very next year.

Here is news from 2006 as reported by Palm Beach Post staff writer Nicole Janok on, “Lake Worth moving to rebuild pier”.

“The $2.8 million project is slated to begin in January and take approximately 10 months”.


LAKE WORTH — Longtime surfer James Linkins remembers the days when Lake Worth Beach had sandbars that produced killer waves. But ever since Hurricanes Frances and Jeanne destroyed the William O. Lockhart Municipal Pier two years ago [2004], the waves haven’t been the same.”

Newspaper clipping from October 28th, 2006.

Click on image to enlarge:

On Sept. 4th, 2004, Hurricane Frances pummeled Lake Worth — then two weeks later we got hit by Hurricane Jeanne — winds estimated 120 mph. Then along came Wilma in 2005. Fast forward to 2009. . .


The William O. Lockhart Municipal Pier held its grand reopening on May 9th, 2009 and Lockhart has kept his place in City of Lake Worth history.



*Does the name Lori Durante sound familiar? It should. Durante is one of Lake Worth’s greatest ambassadors. She was featured in an article by Palm Beach Post business reporter Jennifer Sorentrue:


Delray Beach resident Lori Durante launched Taste History Culinary Tours in 2011, combining the idea of a narrated bus tour with the growing popularity of food tastings.
     She started the venture in Delray Beach, and then added tours in Boynton Beach, Lantana, Lake Worth [emphasis added], and West Palm Beach’s Northwood Village neighborhood and Arts and Entertainment District.

Thursday, September 26, 2019

‘Sober home’ resident murdered and stuffed into a trash can. Case remains unsolved. Video by PBSO below.


Tyler Etue was found murdered 4 years ago
in City of Lake Worth.

Stay anonymous. No fear of retribution.

Lake Worth Beach: Be eligible for a reward for helping solve crime including cold cases.


Former Palm Beach Post journalist Alexandra Seltzer was the lead on this story after Etue was reported missing and posted this update on Sept. 19th, 2015.

On September 9th, 2015, Tyler Etue was found murdered in the City of Lake Worth. It was this news that shocked a lot of people and had the public wondering what was actually happening in those so-called ‘sober homes’ being bought all over town. The people buying these properties called themselves “investors”.

Then a so-called ‘church’ opened up in our Downtown attracting even more drug addicts promising they could get help here in our City. And then the ‘counseling centers’ and self-described treatment centers opened up in this City known as having a “Key West attitude” as some would call it. A party town.

Desperate families up north thought they were sending their children to a treatment center in a sprawling gated community ‘in Lake Worth’ but in actuality these young people were stuffed into overcrowded single family homes in the City of Lake Worth, a coastal municipality four years ago already overwhelmed with problems.

Too late for people such as Tyler Etue was a public meeting the next year on the evening of Sept. 26th, 2016. The public had had enough of sober homes. What happened at that meeting in this City shook the walls in Tallahassee and got everyone’s attention in the halls of the U.S. Congress and President Barack Obama too. For those of you not here at the time click on this link to find out what happened.

Yes. People did come to this City to get help. And yes, many of them did go home in body bags. The murder of Tyler Etue remains unsolved. Somebody knows what happened:


September 2015—While PBSO deputies and detectives handed out information to the public in Lake Worth trying to find a missing person (Tyler Etue) they discovered his body in a trash can. The public is asked to call the Palm Beach County Sheriff's Office or Crimestoppers (800-458-8477) with any information they may have to solve Tyler's murder.


This video is in two parts. One is of the initial investigation and the second concerns the events leading up to the discovery of the body:

Sunday, September 22, 2019

Poolside. The Colony Hotel, Town of Palm Beach, 1961.


Photo courtesy of Slim Aarons.

A timely reminder: Health risks and concerns related to raising chickens in urban environments.


Although many loyal blog readers are all-too-familiar with the history of the ‘Urban Chicken’ we all have to be reminded from time to time there are many new and recently-new residents who know little or nothing about this political fight that once raged in this City.

Yes. The story about the ‘Urban Chicken’ is funny. And yes, it’s a little tongue-in-cheek too. But what’s not so funny is thinking about all the people — including infants, young children and the elderly — who have gotten sick and ended up in the emergency room:

Seven outbreaks of salmonella linked to live poultry in backyard flocks have caused 324 cases of illness in 35 states since January, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Thursday. Sixty-six of the ill individuals have been hospitalized. . . . “Results from these investigations showed that contact with live poultry in backyard flocks was the likely source of these outbreaks,” the agency said.

Without further ado. . .

Raising chickens, aka ‘Urban Chickens’ IS NOT LEGAL in Lake Worth Beach despite what you may have heard.

Besides the many health problems created by raising chickens in an urban environment is attracting predators. In 2017 there were news reports of coyotes as close by as Greenacres killing cats and other small small animals as well. What do coyotes especially like to hunt? You guessed right: chickens (see “Attraction of predators” below).

Some people argue that raising chickens in the backyard makes economic sense. To save a few pennies on eggs? Have you seen the price of eggs lately at Publix?

The ‘urban chicken’ IS NOT merely a nuisance.

The animals present very serious health concerns for young children and the elderly, issues with food safety, infectious diseases, biosecurity, not to mention the added burden on local Code Enforcement to answer complaints and having to take the time and educate the public about the facts.

The following information comes from a well-researched document about human health concerns associated with raising chickens in an urban environment:

  • Bacterial diseases: Salmonella and Campylobacter are common public health hazards potentially associated with chicken contact.
  • Histoplasmosis: Histoplasmosis can cause a respiratory disease with cough and shortness of breath.
  • Avian influenza (bird flu): Avian influenza is a theoretical public health hazard potentially associated with urban chicken farming.
  • Attraction of predators: The attraction of predators is a public health hazard potentially associated with urban chicken farming (e.g., coyotes)
  • Attraction of rodents: The attraction of rodents is a public health hazard potentially associated with urban chicken farming.
  • Nuisance issues

Management and handling of poultry in small backyard flocks:
  • Keep baby chicks and adult poultry away from persons with weaker immune systems, including the elderly, pregnant women, diabetics, patients receiving chemotherapy and people infected with HIV.
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that person not keep chickens if the household has children less than five years of age.
  • Make sure that people who handle the chickens or their droppings, wash hands properly with soap and water following contact.
  • Do not eat or drink around the poultry.
  • Keep poultry away from food preparation areas.
  • Do not wash items, such as water or food dishes, from chicken coops in the kitchen sink.
  • Do not allow poultry to roam in the house.
  • Maintain the area where the poultry are present in a sanitary manner.
  • See your physician if you experience fever and diarrhea.

Conclusion
Communities that permit urban chicken farming are advised to ensure that flock owners receive educational materials on infectious diseases, animal husbandry, food safety and biosecurity. These communities also should have a system in place for responding to community complaints.


Are those few pennies saved raising chickens for eggs worth exposing your neighbors to avoidable health risks and safety issues?


This image is from the blog of Tom McGow, a former blogger-extraordinaire here in this City.

It was Mr. McGow who chronicled the 2009 crusade promoting the ‘urban chicken’. Note that it was during this time the City’s Code Enforcement Dept. was being gutted as well. Ergo why home values plummeted so deeply in this City 8–12 years ago.