Tuesday, April 26, 2016

Code enforcement in Lake Worth: The city manager writes how the City is "Moving Forward"

Contact and other information about the City's Code Compliance Division code is below. What follows are two excerpts from the City's newsletter, Worth Noting, written by the City Manager Michael Bornstein. The newsletter is free and you can sign up using this link. To read the entire article about code enforcement use this link. The city manager writes. . .

     "The history of Code enforcement in Lake Worth has been mixed and we have tried to adapt to the dramatic changes that have occurred within the City. Additionally, larger issues such as the bursting of the housing bubble and the resulting foreclosure crisis as well as trends in the Sober Home market have complicated enforcing the rules.
     Almost three years earlier, it was apparent that the City’s Code Compliance Division was having some serious problems. The Division’s operations were hampered by trying to enforce outdated and inconsistent City Codes and they did not have the resources and training necessary to deal with the difficult circumstances in our City.
     Since then, the organizational issues have been addressed with a complete reworking of the department. The clean-up of the Codes was affected by the City Commission with the adoption of over 50 new ordinances."

[and. . .]

     "Florida is a strong property rights state and has stringent guidelines on Notification of Violation and specific processes to ensure private property rights. This means that it can take many months to resolve a case and this creates a backlog and sometime delays. Code Compliance Officers spend lot of time in managing their case load as well as actively working out in the field to identify new violations.
     Maintaining community standards through Code Compliance is not an easy process. But it is one that we are committed to and one that we have made great progress in over the past several years. Thanks to new and enforceable laws adopted by the City Commission, the creation of the Code Remediation Fund, and a dedicated staff committed to the improvement of the City, we are working to make things better.
     If you have a Code issue you can contact the Code Compliance Division (561-586-1652) or visit their webpage.

In Public Service,
Michael Bornstein
City Manager"

2 comments:

Anonymous said...

One of the best things that ever happened to our city was Mike Bornstein agreeing to become our City Manager. Great guy!

Anonymous said...

Mixed is an understatement. The positives, response to Complaints is quicker. Online form is easy. The negatives, enforcement is all over the place, they close cases when the problems continue, no follow up.

They also seem to like to focus on easy stuff while ignoring the big problem properties. I had a guy doing a huge renovation on a foreclosed house, roof, major electric work, structure changes (in a historic district), digging a big trench in the alley, all with no permits, no safety protocol, etc. I've made several reports and the property has been tagged but the "renovations" continue and online the City says the case has been closed.